Around the Nation

BY Lauren Knapp  November 10, 2010 at 12:17 PM EDT

Here are some of this week’s arts and culture stories from public broadcasting stations around the nation:

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson / VII Network - Now more than two years since the initial financial meltdown, many Americans are still feeling the economic pain. Photographer Ashley Gilbertson tells the story of the financial crisis as it played out on the streets of New York City through a series of images called “Down”.
[via Need to Know

 
- In North Texas this weekend, several props from a recent television series staring Jon Voight go on the auction block. Art & Seek reports on what happens to props after their life on the set has expired.
[via KERA

- “A good piece of glass is a series of events that take place,” says Minneapolis glass blower David Royce. Watch a profile of the young artist, who started working with glass at age 15.
[via MN Original

- Once known as the ‘Queen Mother of Science Fiction’, author Ursula Le Guin is trying her hand at writing poetry. Le Guin shows Oregon Art Beat around the part of southern Oregon that gives her inspiration.
[via Oregon Art Beat

- Fats Domino is well known as one of Rock & Roll’s pioneering influences. But the pianist and songwriter didn’t do it alone. The legendary musician will be honored at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s 2010 American Music Masters Series, along with long-time producer and arranger Dave Bartholomew. Listen to a discussion with Bartholomew, music historians and others.
[via Ideastream

- This week, several of Warhol’s works sold well above their projected price at New York’s contemporary art auction sales. “Men in Her Life” a 1962 silkscreen-and-pencil piece featuring Elizabeth Taylor pulled in $63 million alone.
[via WNYC

After the jump, watch great video arts reports from WTTW and KQED.

– San Francisco-based artist Kate Pocrass is on a mission to make the ordinary exciting. Her project, called ‘Mundane Journeys’, provides followers with a field guide of everyday sites most of us don’t make the effort to notice.
[via KQED

 

 
- Sometimes art is meant to be touched. Thanks to the Chicago Public Art Group, several parks in the Windy City are hosting interactive and durable art works.
[via WTTW