Around the Nation

BY Lauren Knapp  July 27, 2011 at 2:44 PM EST

Here are some of this week’s arts and culture stories from public broadcasting stations around the nation.

Rob Schwimmer, one of the world’s few professional theremin players, talks about the strange instrument known for the eerie sound it emits and being one of the first electronic instruments on Colorado Public Radio|An_Unusual_Instrument_.

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Artist Brooke Hunter-Lombardi lets her 10-year-old son inspire her work, which she tries to make accessible to all ages, from Columbus, Ohio’s WOSU.

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A group of British performers at the abandoned McKittrick Hotel in Manhattan is offering a new way to experience “Macbeth.” The performance piece, “Sleep no More,” is a nightly haunting of the hotel’s five floors based on the Shakespearean mystery. Read a blog post from Need to Know about the performance.

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A group of Tucson artists is putting together a program of performance and video art called “Arizona Between Nosotros.” It brings artists from Mexico to Arizona for a cross-cultural dialogue, according to Arizona Public Media.

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Watch a performance from Minneapolis-based band Roma di Luna on Twin Cities Public Television’s arts and culture program, MN Original. The band is a little jazz, a little folk, and a lot of soul.

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WQXR reports on three new recordings have been released ahead of the 60th Anniversary of Vermont’s Marlboro Festival, known for bringing top classical musicians together.

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In Mobile, Ala., art is a crude imitation of life. Louisiana Public Broadcasting reports on a new exhibit which offers artists’ portrayals of the BP oil spill.

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As part of Thirteen’s ongoing series on the Hudson River, they profile an art teacher who brings her class to draw the river every year.

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Superchunk’s Jon Wurster takes control of WBEZ’s mic and interviews poster artists Dan MacAdam and Dan Grzeca at Pitchfork in Chicago.

Jon Wurster tours Flatstock Poster Convention at Pitchfork for WBEZ from WBEZ on Vimeo.

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Oregon Public Broadcasting profiles cellist Adam Hurst, known for his distinctive style of playing, which he calls “gypsy cello music.”