Art Notes

BY Talea Miller  September 15, 2011 at 2:09 PM EDT

A weekly roundup of arts and culture headlines.

 

John Calley, a long-time Hollywood producer and three-time studio chief, died Tuesday at 81, via the Los Angeles Times. He oversaw numerous commercial and critical hits, including the 1981 film “Chariots of Fire.”

*

The National Endowment for the Arts has announced a new program that more directly engages arts organizations as engines for economic and civic improvement at the local level, via The New York Times.

*

The Toronto International Film Festival is in full swing this week. NPR talked to Los Angeles Times reporter Steven Zeitchik about the big buzz films.

A film by the detained Irainian filmmaker Mojtaba Mirtahmasb about his friend and colleague, the imprisoned filmmaker Jafar Panahi, has been picked up for distribution in the U.S. and U.K., via Reuters. Titled “This Is Not a Film,” the movie was shot on an iPhone and smuggled out of the country in a cake.

*

A new adaptation of “Porgy and Bess,” which caught flack from critics for the ways it differs from the original, will go to Broadway after its run in Cambridge, Mass., via The Boston Globe.

*

British Artist Richard Hamilton, often referred to as the “Father of Pop Art,” died this Tuesday at 89, via The Guardian.

*

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer is joining the jury of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, one of the highest awards given for building design, via The Washington Post.

*

Federal officials in the United States are mandating that an Italian painting on loan to a Tallahassee museum remain there because it may have been stolen by the Nazis during World War II, via the Tallahassee Democrat|mostpopular|text|FRONTPAGE.

*

Michael Hart, the founder of Project Gutenberg, which catalogs free digital copies of books in the public domain, died last week at 64, via The New York Times. Hart is credited with creating the first e-book in the 1970s.

*

On Monday, the European Union agreed to extend royalty protection for music performers and producers to 70 years, via The New York Times.

*

The Pope is loaning Raphael’s “Madonna of Foligno” to Germany to coincide with a papal visit. The work will be displayed beside its sister painting, the “Sistine Madonna,” for the first time, breaking a rule that dictates that work must stay at the Vatican, via Bloomberg.

*

A letter by author J.D. Salinger is listed on eBay for $50,000.  The missive is just one sentence long, and was left for Salinger’s maid, via Reuters.

*

Restorers have uncovered an early work by British street artists Banksy on the walls of an art gallery in Berlin. The graffiti depicts five, angel-winged soldiers with yellow smiley faces, and carries the slogan “Every picture tells a lie!”, via The Washington Post.

*

New York Fashion week ends today. The New York Times comes up with some of the uniting design themes from the runway.

But the Times also ran an editorial by Ashley Mears, a professor, author and former model, about labor conditions for models.