Culture Canvas

BY Annie Strother  March 22, 2012 at 1:31 PM EDT

A weekly roundup of arts and culture headlines.


Click to enlarge. Photo by Karim Sahib/AFP/Getty Images.

A new report from Human Rights Watch identifies improvement as well as continuing problems in the working conditions of South Asian migrants on Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi, via CNN. The $22 billion cultural project is set to house branches of New York University, the Louvre and the Guggenheim. Above, visitors study Babylonian works from 875-860 B.C. at an exhibition on the island last April.

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Monologist Mark Daisey is amending his show “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs” following a storm of criticism over fabricated episodes in the narrative, via The Associated Press.

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Chinese authors are suing Apple for selling unlicensed versions of their books online, via The Associated Press.

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Artists and community residents in Ecatepec, Mexico, hung enormous portraits of individuals affected by violent crimes, giving a faces to swollen police ledgers and news reports, via The New York Times.

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Cellist Yo-Yo Ma and soprano Renee Fleming toured Chicago-area high schools before performing in the city last week, via The Chicago Tribune. The appearances were meant to underscore the importance of arts education.

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San Francisco’s Lyric Opera, which has been on hiatus, opens its first show in three years friday, via The San Francisco Classical Voice.

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Toronto’s public libraries are closed while its library workers strike, via CBC.

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Michigan State University’s Broad Museum, designed by Zaha Hadid, won’t open in time, but the school has just launched a virtual version of the unfinished museum, which you can tour online. Via ARTINFO.

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More American architects are finding work in China, where ambitions building projects can take shape at a rapid pace, via The New York Times.

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At The New Republic, David Bell considers the end of the Encyclopedia Britannica’s paper edition, writing: “It mattered that one could look at a stack of volumes and say: Here are vast libraries, distilled down into an essence of human knowledge, and organized in a logical order. The books testified to the hope that, ultimately, human beings had at least a measure of control over the overpowering torrents of facts and ideas that they collectively produce.”

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Ulu Grosbard, who directed numerous Broadway and film productions, died this week at the age of 83. He directed Robert DeNiro and Meryl Streep in “Falling in Love.”

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Iranian author and translator Simin Daneshvar died this week at the age of 90. Her stories addressed Iran’s social history.

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Ethel Winter, who was a lead dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company, died this week at the age of 87. She performed with Graham from the 1940s through the 1960s, and appears above in this clip from “Appalachian Spring.”

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Gloria Sachs, who designed clothes for the growing ranks of white-collar working women in the 1970s and 1980s, died this week at the age of 85.