Culture Canvas

BY Molly Finnegan  July 10, 2012 at 12:52 PM EST

A weekly roundup of arts and culture headlines.

Writing for the New Yorker, novelist Michael Cunningham explains what happened behind the scenes of the Pulitzer board’s decision to not award any book its fiction prize this year.

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South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley vetoed all arts spending for the state budget late last week, via Charleston City Paper.

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Now in his mid-80s, Gabriel Garcia Marquez is suffering from dementia, according to the author’s brother, via the Los Angeles Times.

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The Wall Street Journal reports on the complexity of trying to bring an evolving real-life story (like that of Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks) to life as a Hollywood movie.

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“House of Earth,” a novel written by Woody Guthrie in the 1940s, will be published in 2013, thanks to some editorial help from writer Douglas Brinkley and Johnny Depp, via The New York Times.

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The Rodin Museum in Philadelphia will reopen after a three-year renovation to reflect its original 1929 incarnation, via The Philadelphia Inquirer.

    The New York Times profiles Matthew McConaghy, around whom a whole sub-genre of romantic comedies has sprung up in the past decade. In new film roles this year, he either bucks that trend or makes it clear he’s self-aware of his onscreen persona.

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    Bill Geist, a humorist, author and TV correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning, announced he has been secretly living with Parkinson’s disease for 10 years.

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    William Faulkner originally wanted his novel “The Sound and the Fury” to be published using four different colored inks. In 1929 he wrote, “I’ll just have to save the idea until publishing grows up.” In honor of the anniversary of his death, a new colored version will be printed, according to the Guardian.

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    “The Hobbit,” a two-part film adaptation of the J.R.R. Tolkien book by “Lord of the Rings” director Peter Jackson, has wrapped after 266 days of shooting. The film production has withstood delays due to studio bankruptcy, a Jackson substitution after the original director (Guillermo del Toro) resigned, and a major labor union dispute in New Zealand, via ARTINFO.