Culture Canvas

BY Annie Strother  November 3, 2011 at 12:20 PM EDT

A roundup of the week’s art headlines.

 
Previously unreleased recordings by Amy Winehouse will be available as a posthumous LP this December, via The Telegraph. The troubled singer died of alcohol poisoning in July. “Our Day Will Come,” a cover of the ’60s R&B song recorded by Ruby & The Romantics, is one of the tracks on the upcoming album.

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Russia’s historic Bolshoi Theatre reopened last Friday for the first time in six years, via The Wall Street Journal. A furor for tickets to its ballet prompted scalping and rowdiness, and police arrived to intervene, via ARTINFO. And there are other points of controversy: an unpopular new opera production, which the audience booed on opening night (via AFP), and a statue of the Greek god Apollo, who, after restoration, was reintroduced to the public with a fig leaf over his genitalia, via The Telegraph.

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Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei says he has two weeks to pay his government the $2.4 million that it is demanding in back taxes and penalties, via The New York Times.

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The European Union is dedicating 105 million euros toward restoring Pompeii, via AFP.

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After more than eight years, the Metropolitan Museum of Art reopened its collection of Islamic and Arabic art, retitling the wing Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia and Later South Asia, via The New York Times.

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Hyperallergic has an #OccupyWallStreet Arts Round-Up.

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A profile at The National of Libyan writer Hisham Matar looks at the cultural shifts at work in the country, where Benghazi alone has 150 new periodicals and journals.

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The Guardian discusses the effect the Arab Spring could have on filmmaking in the region.

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Tom Waits discusses his new album, “Bad As Me,” with Terry Gross of Fresh Air. Fun fact: The vinyl-like pops on one of the tracks is the sound of barbecue chicken cooking.

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Programs at the Museum of Modern Art and elsewhere are developing tours of modern art collections for people living with Alzheimer’s, via ARTNews. The tours aim to engage personal memories, stimulate the brain and get patients talking.

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A new book of paintings by esteemed poet Elizabeth Bishop will be released soon. The Guardian has a slideshow of her work.

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Ruby Cohn, a theater critic and authority on Samuel Beckett, died this week at 89, via The New York Times. Her studies of Beckett, who was unknown at the time, launched both of them to renown.