Monday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  April 12, 2010 at 10:51 AM EST

Ma'moun Kanan, assistant manager of the Cinema Jenin project, looks at a strip of an old Arabic black-and-white movie found during renovations of the city's old movie theatre in Jenin, West Bank. Photo by David Silverman/ Getty Images

Ma’moun Kanan, assistant manager of the Cinema Jenin project, looks at a strip of an old Arabic black-and-white movie found during renovations of the city’s old movie theatre in Jenin, West Bank. Twenty-two years after it was closed during the first Palestinian intifada, German director Marcus Vetter and his team of local Palestinian staff and foreign volunteers are turning the run-down cinema into a modern cinematheque. Photo by David Silverman/ Getty Images

*

A home movie showing Charlie Chaplin on a boat was recently discovered in Vermont. The film was shot by a young Alistair Cooke (the inimitable broadcast journalist also known to PBS viewers as the host of Masterpiece Theater) and found by his daughter, who held a screening of the short film in Montpelier last Wednesday, via Associated Press.

*

Almost 30 years ago, the incredible UFO set piece used by George Clinton and the Parliament Funkadelic at their stage shows was abandoned somewhere in the wilds of suburban Maryland. The Washington Post went in search of the mothership.

*

In March, a team from Villanova University helped the Vatican launch a virtual, 3-D simulation of the Sistine Chapel, via Artnet.

Recently, the Times asked why the church doesn’t embrace and patronize contemporary visual art as it did for centuries (a la the Sistine Chapel).

*

The Vatican is finally embracing one group of artists — the Church has officially ended its decades-old squabble with the Beatles, via Associated Press.

*

The Los Angeles Times traces the history of critical debate on ‘Kapo’, which will be released on DVD this week. The 1959 film by Italian director Gillo Pontecorvo was one of the first to attempt to depict the horrors of the Holocaust, but many critics argued that the film was not able to live up to the great responsibility of its intentions.