Monday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  April 19, 2010 at 9:52 AM EDT

Fiber glass and colored mirror sculptures by renowned French sculptor <a href=Niki de Saint Phalle are part of a new unique installation sponsored by the National Museum of Women in the Arts and the District Department of Transportation through its Transportation Enhancement Program in Washington, D.C. Photo by Tim Sloan/ AFP/ Getty Images” src=“http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/images/0419_saintphalle.jpg” width=“550” height=“366” class=“mt-image-left” style=“float: left; margin: 0 20px 20px 0;” />

Fiber glass and colored mirror sculptures by renowned French sculptor Niki de Saint Phalle are part of a new unique installation sponsored by the National Museum of Women in the Arts and the District Department of Transportation through its Transportation Enhancement Program in Washington, D.C. The New York Avenue Sculpture Project is the first and only major outdoor sculpture corridor in the Nation’s capital, featuring changing installations of world-class art by women. Photo by Tim Sloan/ AFP/ Getty Images

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President George Washington never returned two of his library books, via NPR.

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When times are tough, museums do more with the collections they already have, like the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s upcoming Picasso exhibit, via The Wall Street Journal.

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The National Gallery in London is also pulling paintings from its own holdings for a special exhibit in June. The show, called ‘Close Examination: Fakes, Mistakes and Discoveries’, will feature over 40 works of forgery that the museum has bought under false pretenses, via the Independent.

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Carolyn Rodgers has died at age 69. The Chicago poet was one the leading voices of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 70s, and a founder of Third World Press, a small publishing house devoted to printing works related to African American issues and culture, via Chicago Public Radio.

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Dede Allen, the innovative (and Oscar nominated) film editor whose fast paced cuts in films like “Dog Day Afternoon” and ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ helped define that era of filmmaking, has died at age 86 in Los Angeles, via the New York Times.