Monday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  May 9, 2011 at 11:00 AM EST

A person visits an exhibition entitled 'Echos travaux in situ', devoted to French artist Daniel Buren's work at the Centre Pompidou-Metz museum on May 6, 2011. Photo by Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/ AFP/ Getty Images

A person visits an exhibition entitled ‘Echos travaux in situ’, devoted to French artist Daniel Buren’s work at the Centre Pompidou-Metz museum on May 6, 2011. The exhibit runs from May 8 to September 9, 2011. Photo by Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/ AFP/ Getty Images

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A museum in Normandy returned a mummified, tattooed Maori head to a museum in New Zealand for burial, as part of an effort by the Maori people and the New Zealand government to reclaim the remains that had once been seen by Europeans as exotic trophies, via The Associated Press.

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Three major publishers are backing a new online project called Bookish, where readers can learn about new books, share reviews with an online community, and, most significantly, shop, via Publishers Weekly.

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Book editor Robert Loomis, 85, who has worked at Random House for 54 years and has been editor to William Styron, Maya Angelou and Shelby Foote, has announced his June retirement, via The New York Times.

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A new study found that looking at art can increase blood flow and trigger the same pleasure hormone in the brain that you experience when you have feelings of love, via The Telegraph.

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The National Endowment for the Arts will now offer grants to artists who create videos games, via IFC.

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Actor Colin Firth, who won an Academy Award for his role in “The King’s Speech,” has had trouble shaking off the stutter he adopted for the film, via TIME.

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The Los Angeles Times updates the story on Berlin’s Kunsthaus Tacheles, a famous artists’ squat and studio which is the subject of a major dispute of development and gentrification.

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NPR talks to artists and musicians in Benghazi, Libya about fighting the regime through cultural rebellion.

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Iraq held its first book festival for the first time in 20 years, via The Independent.

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The Los Angeles Times reports on the death of Bill Blackbeard, 84, a comics enthusiast-turn-scholar, who helped change the perception of comics from pulp to an art form worth study and preservation.

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Christopher Knight corrects the record on a story we included in Art Notes on Friday, explaining that the Walton gift of $800 million to an art museum in Arkansas is actually not a record, via the Los Angeles Times.