The Oscar Documentaries, Part 5: ’5 Broken Cameras’

BY Jeffrey Brown  February 22, 2013 at 1:37 PM EDT

We’re talking to all of the filmmakers nominated this year for an Academy Award in the category of Best Documentary Feature, including David France, director of “How to Survive a Plague,” Malik Bendjelloul (“Searching for Sugarman”), Kirby Dick (“The Invisible War”), and Dror Moreh (“The Gatekeepers”).

Our final conversation in the series is with Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi, directors of “5 Broken Cameras.”

In 2005, a Palestinian farmer named Emad Burnat acquired a video camera to document the birth and early life of his son. He did that but also captured in great detail what was going on around his family: the building of a security wall in the West Bank by Israelis, demonstrations by villagers against what they saw as this encroachment on their lands, and an increasingly tense situation that in some cases led to imprisonment, violence and death.

Along the way, one camera after another — five in all — were destroyed. Each became a kind of chapter in the story.

Burnat and Israeli filmmaker Guy Davidi later turned this footage into the documentary, “5 Broken Cameras” — now nominated for an Academy Award.

I spoke with Burnat and Davidi both by phone from New York.

A transcript will be added soon.