Thursday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  May 20, 2010 at 10:09 AM EST

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A painting featuring North Korean schoolchildren is shown as part of the opening of the Democratic People’s Republic of North Korean state art exhibition ‘Flowers of Kim Il Sung’ in Vienna. Sixteen portraits of Kim and his father, the founder of North Korea, are being exhibited for the first time abroad, according to museum officials. The pair are the subject of an all-embracing personality cult in North Korea. The exhibition runs until September 5. Photo by Joe Klamar/ AFP/ Getty Images

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A masked intruder entered the Paris Museum of Modern Art overnight and stole five paintings worth more than $600 million, via AFP.

The Guardian explains what made these paintings particularly special.

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Japanese photographer Kishin Shinoyama was indicted Thursday for public indecency and blasphemy after a 2008 photo shoot where he took nude photos of women in a public Tokyo graveyard, via the Associated Press.

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Britain’s biggest literary honor, the Man Booker Prize, has been awarded retroactively to a book by the late J.G. Farrell, which was published in 1970 — the only year since 1969 the prize had not been given out, via the New York Times.

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Slate profiles composer turned computer scientist David Cope, whose latest album of Bach-like classical compositions was written mostly by a software program he designed.

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The Washington Post reviews a gallery show in New York where two artists bring new meaning to the postmodern concept of appropriation — they literally just steal small pieces of material off famous works of art.