Thursday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  January 13, 2011 at 10:43 AM EST

A general shot of atmosphere at the unveiling of a new dish created by performance artist Marina Abramovic and chef Kevin Lasko at Park Avenue Winter restaurant on January 12, 2011 in New York City. Photo by Stephen Lovekin/ Getty Images

A general shot of atmosphere at the unveiling of a new dish created by performance artist Marina Abramovic and chef Kevin Lasko at Park Avenue Winter restaurant on January 12, 2011 in New York City. Photo by Stephen Lovekin/ Getty Images

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Brisbane’s art museums suffer in the Australia flood, but no art work has been damaged, via The Art Newspaper.

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New York City wants to work with Broadway theaters to ensure its emergency and evacuation plans are up to date, via The New York Times.

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Big touring stage shows boosted local economies by $3.35 billion dollars in 2008-09 , via Variety.

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Christopher Knight at the Los Angeles Times makes note of some art historical instances of artists illustrating the idea of “blood libel.”

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A Swedish “sequel” to The Catcher in the Rye is banned in the U.S., but not for the same reason as the original Salinger novel, via BBC.

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Artnet has a visual preview of the newly renovated Museum of Moving Images in Queens, NY, which reopens to the public January 15.

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Princeton University has lost two seminal art history scholars. Oleg Grabar, 81, helped develop the academic study of Islamic art and culture, via The New York Times. And Robert J. Clark, 73, helped renew national interest in the Arts and Crafts architectual movement, via the Associated Press.