Thursday’s Art Notes

BY Quinn Bowman  February 4, 2010 at 11:38 AM EDT

An auctioneer takes bids on Alberto Giacometti's sculpture 'L'Homme qui marche' at Sotheby's in London on February 3, 2010. Photo by Carl Court/ AFP/ Getty Images

An auctioneer takes bids on Alberto Giacometti’s sculpture ‘L’Homme qui marche’ at Sotheby’s in London on February 3, 2010, which was sold for 58 million pounds ($93,090 million), a world record for an art work at auction, said auctioneers at Sotheby’s. Photo by Carl Court/ AFP/ Getty Images

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After Giacometti’s ‘L’Homme qui marche’ broke the record for the most expensive piece of art ever sold at auction, the question is, how high can we go now (and will the art market be able to sustain the jump)?

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The Tehran Symphony Orchestra just finished a tour of concert dates around Europe. The New York Times has a dispatch on the troubled tour, and thoughts about the confluence of cultural diplomacy and state propaganda.

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Baltimore’s Public Works Museum, the only one of its kind in the world, closed Wednesday due to a city budget shortfall.

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But there was slightly better news in California, where arts programs were spared from budget cuts in Los Angeles, and the ailing Pasadena Playhouse got some donations, though it may still not be enough to keep it open.