Tuesday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  March 23, 2010 at 10:39 AM EST

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Italian artist Zazzaro works on a metal sculpture at the Kunsthaus Tacheles artists’ colony’s outdoor gallery in Berlin’s mitte district. The building was erected in the early 20th century and taken over by artists after the fall of the Berlin wall. It was originally occupied by a number of international artists, performers and musicians before becoming an art center with a cafe, cinema, performance space, workshops and exhibition space. The artists’ collective faces expropriation after their lease expired at the end of 2008 and are fighting an uphill battle to preserve the space, located in Berlin’s increasingly expensive Mitte district. Photo by John MacDougall/ AFP/ Getty Images

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The adult children of famous British conductor Sir Edward Downes and wife Joan will not be charged in relation to the couple’s assisted suicide in Switzerland last year. You can read more about the story and their lives here.

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Christopher Knight from the LA Times does a close analysis of a photo released from the White House of President Obama and his staff celebrating the vote on health care reform.

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Now as ubiquitous and commonplace as an email, you may have come to underappreciate the simple beauty of the @ symbol. The MoMA hasn’t — it’s inducted the typographic mark into its famous design collection.

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Speaking of design at MoMA, French architect Jean Nouvel reveals his plans for the National Museum of Qatar there on Tuesday, a design that NY Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff calls possibly Nouvel’s “most overtly poetic act of cultural synthesis yet.” Last year, Jeffrey Brown talked to Roger Mandle, executive director of the Qatar Museums Authority and the head of the new Museum of Islamic Art in Doha.

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The Art Institute of Chicago is expected to announce that its new modern wing, designed by Renzo Piano, is now an LEED certified green building. The NewsHour profiled the new addition at the Institute last June, and Art Beat featured extended interviews with Piano and museum director James Cuno.