Tuesday’s Art Notes

BY Arts Desk  January 19, 2010 at 10:00 AM EST

Musicians perform as Bulgarian 'Kukeri' dancers perform their ritual dance around a bonfire in the village of Elovdol. Photo by Ditmar Dilkoff/ AFP/ Getty Images

Musicians perform as Bulgarian ‘Kukeri’ dancers perform their ritual dance around a bonfire in the village of Elovdol. The Kukeri Carnival is a festival of brightly colored masks and costumes which marks the beginning of spring. Every participant makes his or her own multi-colored mask covered with beads, ribbons and woolen tassels and bells tied around the waist are intended to drive away the evil spirits and the sickness. Photo by Ditmar Dilkoff/ AFP/ Getty Images

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The Cleveland Orchestra ended their one-day strike over a five percent paycut after reaching a tenative deal Tuesday morning.

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The Chinese government is ending the 2-D theatrical run band of the film “Avatar” early to replace it with a biopic of the philosopher Confucius. It’s believed that officials were concerned that Avatar was taking too much of the market share away from Chinese cinema.

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Carl Smith, who was one of the biggest names in country music in the 1950s, has died in Nashville at age 82. A regular performer at the Grand Ole Opry, Smith was also the first husband of June Carter Cash.

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California’s signature music event (and what’s become one of the major American festivals), the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival, announced its lineup Tuesday morning. Indie-rock band Pavement, which disbanded in 1999, will reunite for the concert. Also heading to the desert April 16-18 will be hip hop mogul Jay-Z, British rockers Muse and Thom Yorke, and New York indie ambassadors MGMT, Vampire Weekend, Dirty Projectors and Grizzly Bear.

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On Monday, the newest winners of the top prizes in Children’s Literature were announced. ‘When You Reach Me,’ a bestselling young adult novel by Rebecca Stead, won the Newbery Medal, and Jerry Pinkney’s picture book ‘The Lion and The Mouse’ won the Caldecott Medal.

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For the first time in 60 years, no one left a bottle of cognac and a bouquet of roses on the grave of gothic master Edgar Allen Poe on the anniversary of the poet’s birth. A crowd of people came out to watch the traditional offering from a distance, but the mysterious devotee did not turn up.