Tuesday’s Art Notes

BY Tom LeGro  June 21, 2011 at 1:15 PM EDT

A Soviet-era tank, painted pink in 1991 by visual artist David Cerny, sits on a pontoon on the Vltava River in Prague, Czech Republic. The tank was being returned to Prague from a military museum for the commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the departure of Soviet troops who invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968. Photo by Michal Cizek /AFP/Getty Images.

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Katherine G. Farley, chairwoman of Lincoln Center, is involved in developing two projects in China: a consulting deal in which Lincoln Center will help China’s government build a performing arts center in Tianjin and a construction project in which her company, Tishman Speyer, is building offices and residential projects next door, via the New York Times.

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French sculptor Daniel Buren has canceled a July exhibition at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing in “solidarity” with detained Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Buren’s decision follows that of British sculptor Anish Kapoor, who called off an exhibition at Beijing’s National Museum of China as part of next year’s “UK Now” festival, via Agence France-Presse.

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A Japanese music foundation sold a renowned, 300-year-old Stradivarius violin for $16 million at a London auction to raise money for tsunami disaster relief. The Nippon Foundation said Tuesday that proceeds from selling “the Lady Blunt” will go to relief projects in northern Japan, via the Associated Press.

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Warner Bros. settled the lawsuit brought by tattoo artist S. Victor Whitmill over the tattoo on actor Ed Helms’ face in “The Hangover II,” which Whitmill claimed infringed a copyrighted tattoo he created for boxer Mike Tyson. Terms of the settlement were not disclosed, via Reuters.

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A day after the Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of Wal-Mart, the New Yorker looks at the art collection of Alice Walton, who is the daughter of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton, is the third richest woman in the world, and who is building a museum in Bentonville, Ark., set to open in November.

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Ballots for the Emmy Awards are due back to the academy on Friday. NPR’s “All Things Considered” and critic Eric Deggans focus on names “which haven’t been discussed much before, in hopes some Academy members might pay attention.”