Wednesday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  January 12, 2011 at 10:15 AM EST

'We' by Maurizio Cattelan is displayed during the '8 1/2' Exhibition' press preview held during the Pitti Immagine Uomo 79 on January 11, 2011 in Florence, Italy. Photo by Vittorio Zunino Celotto/ Getty Images

‘We’ by Maurizio Cattelan is displayed during the ’8 1/2’ Exhibition’ press preview held during the Pitti Immagine Uomo 79 on January 11, 2011 in Florence, Italy. Photo by Vittorio Zunino Celotto/ Getty Images

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Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s Shanghai studio was torn down on Tuesday without forewarning, via AFP.

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A settlement has been reached in the lawsuit between Shepard Fairey and the Associated Press, via NPR. Among the terms, Fairey has agreed not to use AP photos unless he licenses them first, but the artist may also create some collaborative commissions based on AP images.

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Plus, a piece on why street art doesn’t always make the easiest transition into a museum setting, via ARTINFO.

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Part of late Dennis Hopper’s art collection was sold at auction on Tuesday, including a portrait of Mao Zedong by Andy Warhol that the late actor had accidentally shot with bullets, via CBC. Just before the auction, Hopper’s estranged widow had gone to court to stop 32 pieces from hitting the block.

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The New York Times picks up a yarn (originally reported on by the Art Newspaper) about a generous fraud who posed as a Jesuit priest to donate forged works of art he had painted to museums.

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A new study — based on schooling, the consumption of newspapers and magazines, plus the use of libraries, the Internet and bookstores — ranks Washington as the most literate city in America, via the Hartford Courant.

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ARTINFO talks to the curator responsible for a recent performance art series at the MoMA.