Wednesday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  February 2, 2011 at 10:36 AM EDT

0202_tabard.jpg

An early 18th century herald’s tabard made by an unknown English artist is on view now through June 2011 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art as part of the exhibit The Peacock Male: Exuberance and Extremes in Masculine Dress. Made of a silk satin weave with silk and gilt fabric applique, glass beads, and silk and gilt thread embroidery. Gift of Elizabeth Malcolm Bowman in memory of Wendell Phillips Bowman, 1930. Image courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art

*

Egypt’s culture minister says most of Egypt’s antiquities are secure, and the ones that have been damaged can be restored, via The New York Times.

*

UNESCO made a plea to Egyptian authorities and protestors alike to honor their cultural heritage and avoid damaging or looting national treasures, via AFP

*

The Washington Post considers where the looted artifacts will end up, and whether auction houses and museums will be able to recognize them and return them.

*

A Philadelphia woman who was involved in online terrorist communities and planned to kill a Swedish cartoonist for depicting the prophet Muhammad, has pleaded guilty in a federal case against her, via The Associated Press.

*

Russian museums have canceled planned loans of art work to U.S. institutions due to a diplomatic squabble over a Jewish religious archive, which used to be run by an organization now based in Brooklyn, which has been trying to claim and relocate the collection after being held by the Russian (and previously Soviet) government since the end of the war, The New York Times.

*

Italy agrees to limit advertisements on its ancient monuments (via The Art Newspaper), but Paris’ Musee d’Orsay has put Kate Moss on their facade (via Artforum, 2nd graf).

*

Brian Rust, the jazz scholar who invented the modern “discography” — a comprehensive inventory of recordings in a particular genre or by a musical act — has died in England at the age of 88, via The New York Times.