Wednesday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  March 2, 2011 at 11:50 AM EDT

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After a four year, 2.5-billion-yuan expansion, people visited the National Museum Of China as it reopened on Tuesday in Beijing, China. Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ Getty Images

The National Museum of China, soon to be the largest museum in the world, covers Chinese history, but does not include information about the violence of the Cultural Revolution or Tiananmen Square, via AFP.

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The musicians of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra say they’ll end their almost six-month strike if the management will agree to binding arbitration, via the Detroit Free-Press|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s.

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On Wednesday at the White House, President Barack Obama will honor 19 artists and scholars with the National Medal for Arts and the National Humanities Medal, including several people we’ve interviewed at NewsHour over the years: writers Joyce Carol Oates, Donald Hall, Philip Roth, pianist Van Cliburn, and historian Gordon Wood.

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Former Sen. Christopher Dodd will take over as chief lobbyist for the Motion Picture Association of America, via the Los Angeles Times.

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A new museum that houses the art collection of Carlos Slim, the richest man in the world, was inaugurated in Mexico City on Tuesday, via The Associated Press. The museum opens to the public on March 29.

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Boston Symphony Orchestra Music Director James Levine has withdrawn as conductor for the remainder of the season, suffering from back pain, via The Boston Globe.

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Librarians are voicing anger over a new e-book policy from publisher Harper Collins that limits the amount of times a digital title can be “lent” each year before libraries have to buy a new license, via Publishers Weekly.

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Eugene Fodor, an award-winning American violin virtuoso whose lifestyle in the 1970s and 80s more resembled that of a rock star than a classical musician, has died from liver failure at the age of 60, via The Washington Post.