Wednesday’s Art Notes

BY Molly Finnegan  August 17, 2011 at 12:16 PM EDT

0617_chinaopera.jpg

Artists participating in the production of a Chinese opera get ready behind the stage during the Hungry Ghost festival in Malaysia’s northern town of Bukit Mertajam on August 16, 2011. According to the traditional annual Chinese festival, the spirits of the departed walk the earth at this time of year, with practitioners leaving out food to placate the hungry souls. The festival is celebrated during the seventh lunar month of the Chinese calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Photo by Saeed Khan/ AFP/ Getty Images

*

A court case against the author of the bestselling novel turned hit movie “The Help” has been dismissed in Mississippi, via The Guardian. Kathryn Stockett was accused of basing her main character on a woman who works for the author’s brother, but a judge ruled that the statute of limitations had run out on the case.

*

The original lead singer of the Village People, has filed to regain the copyright of their biggest hit, “YMCA,” via The New York Times.

*

After a woman twice attacked art works at the National Gallery of Art, the Washington Post looks at the lengths museums must go to in order to protect their works from harm.

*

Meanwhile, ARTINFO profiles the man at the National Gallery who’s in charge of several special boxes containing masterpieces that will be the first to be saved in case of total disaster.

*

New York’s Metropolitan Opera demanded that a blog stop posting unconfirmed information about future productions, via the Los Angeles Times.

*

The Los Angeles Times looks at a huge new Chinese animation studio, part of the country’s campaign to increase its cultural influence around the world.

*

Broadway’s “Lion King” announced it will do a special performance for an audience of children with autism in October, via The Associated Press.