Weekly Poem: ‘The Role of Elegy’

BY Tom LeGro  November 12, 2012 at 3:59 PM EST

By Mary Jo Bang

The role of elegy is
To put a death mask on tragedy,
A drape on the mirror.
To bow to the cultural

Debate over the anesthetization of sorrow,
Of loss, of the unbearable
Afterimage of the once material.
To look for an imagined

Consolidation of grief
So we can all be finished
Once and for all and genuinely shut up
The cabinet of genuine particulars.

Instead there’s the endless refrain
One hears replayed repeatedly
Through the just ajar door:
Some terrible mistake has been made.

What is elegy but the attempt
To rebreathe life
Into what the gone one once was
Before he grew to enormity.

Come on stage and be yourself,
The elegist says to the dead. Show them
Now — after the fact —
What you were meant to be:

The performer of a live song.
A shoe. Now bow.
What is left but this:
The compulsion to tell.

The transient distraction of ink on cloth
One scrubbed and scrubbed
But couldn’t make less.
Not then, not soon.

Each day, a new caption on the cartoon
Ending that simply cannot be.
One hears repeatedly, the role of elegy is.

Bang_Mary_Jo_NEW_Mark_Schafer_homepage_square_thumbnail.jpgMary Jo Bang is the author of several books of poetry, including most recently a translation of Dante’s “Inferno” (2012), “The Bride of E” (2009) and “Elegy” (2007), which won the National Book Critics Circle award.