Alicia A. Caldwell, Associated Press

Alicia's Most Recent Stories

  • July 22, 2014

    The Homeland Security Department said Tuesday it arrested 192 people along the Mexican border in South Texas on immigrant-smuggling charges and seized more than $625,000, part of the Obama administration’s efforts to discourage and disrupt the flood of tens of thousands of people crossing the border illegally. Continue reading

  • July 11, 2014

    President Barack Obama’s $3.7 billion emergency request for the border crisis is too big and the House won’t approve it, the chairman of the House committee that controls spending said Friday. “It’s too much money. We don’t need it,” Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers, R-Ky., told reporters.
    Continue reading

  • July 10, 2014

    Republicans demanded speedier deportations, which the White House initially had supported but left out of its proposal after complaints from immigrant advocates and some Democrats. The top House and Senate Democrats pointedly left the door open to them.

    “It’s not a deal-breaker,” said House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. “Let them have their face-saver. But let us have the resources to do what we have to do.” Continue reading

  • June 20, 2014

    The Obama administration is opening new detention facilities to house immigrant families caught crossing the border together illegally. This is after months of an immigration surge from Central America. Continue reading

  • June 13, 2014

    WASHINGTON — The surge in immigrant children caught crossing the southern border in Texas that has dominated headlines and risks becoming a political crisis for President Barack Obama and Congress includes a new threat facing Border Patrol agents: reporters.

    An assistant chief patrol agent, Eligio “Lee” Pena, warned more than 3,000 Border Patrol agents that journalists looking for information about what Obama has described as a humanitarian crisis are likely to ask for information and “may try to disguise themselves.” The email, obtained by The Associated Press, said agents should not speak to reporters, on or off duty, without advanced permission and warned that anyone who does could be charged with a crime or disciplined administratively. Continue reading