Julie Rovner, Kaiser Health News

Julie's Most Recent Stories

  • September 17, 2014

    Catholic and other religious hospitals and universities have been arguing in federal court for much of the past two years that they shouldn’t have to offer or facilitate birth control as part of their employee health plans because it violates their religious beliefs. But what happens when the insurance company is itself Catholic? It turns out that Catholic health plans have for years been arranging for outside firms to provide contraceptive coverage to their enrollees. Continue reading

  • July 22, 2014

    A three-judge panel at the U.S. Appeals Court for the D.C. Circuit threw the fate of an important part of the Affordable Care Act into doubt Tuesday. In a 2-1 decision in Halbig v. Burwell, the judges ruled that the Internal Revenue Service lacked the authority to allow subsidies to be provided in exchanges not run by the states. That could put at immediate risk the millions of people who bought insurance in the 36 states where these online insurance marketplaces are run by the federal government. Continue reading

  • June 30, 2014

    More than half the states have “contraceptive equity” laws on the books that require most employers whose health insurance covers prescription drugs to also cover FDA-approved contraceptives as part of that package. Unlike the ACA, those laws do not require that coverage to be available without deductibles or co-pays. Continue reading

  • June 18, 2014

    One of the most watched issues before the Supreme Court this term will may turn on the question of religious freedom. But it will also likely determine how women will be able to access a key provision of the Affordable Care Act – one seeking to guarantee no-cost prescription contraception in most health insurance plans. Continue reading

  • May 8, 2014

    As rocky as its rollout was, it cost the federal exchange an average of $647 of federal tax dollars to sign up each enrollee, according to a new report. It cost an average of $1,503 to sign up each person in the 15 exchanges run by individual states and Washington, D.C. Continue reading