PBS NewsHour

PBS's Most Recent Stories

  • July 23, 2017

    The Italian city of Venice is prone to frequent flooding because it has sunk five inches over the last century, but it is also grappling with a new challenge: sea-level rise, caused by climate change, which increases the severity. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Christopher Livesay reports on the risks, and Italy’s plans to mitigate them, as part of our series “Peril and Promise,” on the challenge of climate change. Continue reading

  • July 23, 2017

    The White House said Sunday President Trump intends to sign a bill that would toughen sanctions on Russia for attempting to meddle in the presidential election and for its military aggression in Syria and Ukraine. The bill would limit the president’s ability to end the sanctions on his own. Matt Flegenheimer of The New York Times joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the legislation. Continue reading

  • July 23, 2017

    The U.S. Justice Department, in partnership with European investigators, has shut down two of the dark web’s largest websites. The black market sites were allegedly purveyors of illegal drugs, guns and hacking tools, according to federal charges announced on Thursday. WIRED magazine reporter Andy Greenberg joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the case. Continue reading

  • July 22, 2017

    “Bombs in our Backyard,” a new investigative series from ProPublica, looks at how the Pentagon’s disposal of military waste has created thousands of toxic sites in the United States. Abrahm Lustgarten, who reported the story for ProPublica, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss how the Pentagon’s management of munitions waste has become a health risk for communities across the country. Continue reading

  • July 22, 2017

    U.S. immigration officials on Sunday are expected to begin four days of nationwide raids targeting teenagers suspected of belonging to gangs, under a plan outlined in a U.S. Department of Homeland Security document that has been viewed by Reuters. Reuters reporter Julia Edwards Ainsley, who broke the story, joins Hari Sreenivasan from Washington to discuss. Continue reading