Sam Weber

Sam Weber

Sam Weber has covered everything from living on minimum wage to consumer finance as a shooter/producer for PBS NewsHour Weekend. Prior joining NH Weekend, he previously worked for Need to Know on PBS and in public radio. He’s an avid cyclist and Chicago Bulls fan.

Sam's Most Recent Stories

  • April 8, 2017

    Since it was founded in 2011, U.S.-based nonprofit GiveDirectly has given cash unconditionally to villagers in eastern Africa, particularly Kenya and Uganda. The nonprofit’s most recent project involves providing a basic income consisting of cash payments to every adult in a rural Kenyan village. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Christopher Livesay reports from Kenya. Continue reading

  • February 18, 2017

    The newly-designated Gold Butte National Monument in Nevada contains fragile wildlife habitat, important sites for native tribes and thousands of ancient rock etchings. While local indigenous tribes, environmental advocacy groups and Democrats cheered former President Obama’s decision to bring the area under federal protection, some longtime residents vehemently opposed it. NewsHour Weekend’s Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Continue reading

  • November 6, 2016

    Four times in U.S. history, the winner of the nationwide popular vote has lost the Electoral College and the general election. But a proposal called the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact would automatically allocate participating states’ Electoral College votes to whoever wins the national popular vote. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Continue reading

  • October 23, 2016

    Even if Hillary Clinton wins the White House, she could face difficulties on Capitol Hill, if Republicans continue to control the House of Representatives and Senate. One of the most vulnerable Republican incumbents is Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield went to the Keystone State to look at Toomey’s challenge. Continue reading

  • September 24, 2016

    Gerrymandering — the practice of drawing districts to benefit one political party over another or to protect an incumbent — has a long history in the U.S. Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield reports on reform efforts in Maryland, where one district has been called a “broken-winged pterodactyl,” and in North Carolina, where litigation is challenging partisan redistricting. Continue reading