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News Wrap: Efforts Stall to Form Cabinet in Libya’s Transitional Government

September 19, 2011 at 12:00 AM EDT
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KWAME HOLMAN: Wall Street struggled today with worries about the Greek debt crisis. Stocks cut their losses late in the day, but the market still snapped a five-day winning streak. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 108 points to close at 11401. The Nasdaq fell more than nine points to close at 2612.

Away from the trading floor, some 200 protesters marched for a third day, charging the financial system favors corporations. At least six people were arrested.

Rebels in Libya tried to regroup today to renew fighting on two fronts. In Sirte, Moammar Gadhafi’s hometown, smoke could be seen as the two sides traded fire. And in Bani Walid, rebels tried to fight their way back into the city after Gadhafi loyalists forced them to pull back on Sunday. Meanwhile, efforts to form a new Cabinet in the transitional government stalled. Some cities complained they were under-represented.

NATO officials in Afghanistan have confirmed the deaths of two troops, in addition to three killed over the weekend in separate attacks. So far in September, 26 international troops have been killed. Meanwhile, President Hamid Karzai left Afghanistan today for the U.N. General Assembly session in New York. He’s set to discuss war developments and seek more help in peace efforts.

In Japan, thousands of protesters marched in Tokyo today, insisting the government abandon nuclear power. Police estimated the crowd at 20,000. Organizers said there were three times that many. The marchers carried banners, beat drums, and chanted, “Sayonara, nuclear power.” The protest came six months after the tsunami disaster caused the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant to spew radiation.

Rescue crews fanned out in northeastern India after a powerful earthquake that killed at least 53 people. The Sunday night quake had a magnitude of 6.9. It shook remote parts of India, Nepal, and Tibet, with the worst damage in India. More than 100,000 homes were damaged across the rugged Himalayan region. Many towns in the zone lost electricity.

Former Illinois Senator Charles Percy died over the weekend in Washington. He had Alzheimer’s disease. Percy was a moderate Republican who served three terms, starting in 1966. He chaired the Foreign Relations Committee and considered a run for president in the 1970s.

But, increasingly, he clashed with party conservatives, and he lost his reelection bid in 1984. At his death, Charles Percy was 91 years old.

Those are some of the day’s major stories.