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Years of Denial, Cyclist Lance Armstrong Admits Performance-Enhancing Drug Use

January 16, 2013 at 12:00 AM EST
For many years the number one cyclist in the world, the now disgraced Lance Armstrong admitted in an interview with Oraph Winfrey that he had used performance-enhancing drugs, despite past refusals. Ray Suarez reports on where investigations and penalties may lead now that Armstrong has confessed.
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RAY SUAREZ: Finally tonight: why Lance Armstrong may be coming clean about not riding totally clean during his rise to the top of his sport.

OPRAH WINFREY, “Oprah’s Next Chapter”: We agreed that there would be no conditions.

RAY SUAREZ: Lance Armstrong’s interview with Oprah Winfrey won’t begin airing until tomorrow night, but reports that he’s admitted to doping have already triggered strong reactions.

FRANKIE ANDREU, former teammate of Lance Armstrong: It’s a long time coming.

RAY SUAREZ: Frankie Andreu was once close to Armstrong, as a team captain of the U.S. Postal Service cycling team from 1998 to 2000.

FRANKIE ANDREU: I got e-mails.

RAY SUAREZ: But Andreu was ostracized after he and his fiancee, now wife, Betsy, testified in 2005 that Armstrong acknowledged using performance-enhancing drugs.

FRANKIE ANDREU: For my wife and I, we have been attacked and ripped apart by Lance and all of his people and all his supporters repeatedly for a long time.

And I just wish they wouldn’t have been so blind and opened up their eyes earlier to all the signs that indicated that there was deception there, so that we wouldn’t have had to suffer as much.

And it’s not only us. I mean, he’s ruined a lot of people’s lives.

RAY SUAREZ: Regulators from the official bodies that police cycling are also speaking out. Head of the World Anti-Doping Agency, David Howman, has demanded Armstrong make his confession under oath.

He told the Associated Press, “He’s got to follow a certain course. That is not talking to a talk show host.”

Armstrong vehemently denied doping for more than a decade, insisting he’d been tested hundreds of times and never failed a test. Now the International Cycling Union has commissioned an investigation into claims that positive test samples were hidden in exchange for money.

For its part, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has already banned Armstrong for life, and it’s pressing him now to name others involved in the long-running doping scheme on the Postal Service team.

Meanwhile, Armstrong was out of sight today, said to be on his way to Hawaii.

RAY SUAREZ: Finally tonight: why Lance Armstrong may be coming clean about not riding totally clean during his rise to the top of his sport.

OPRAH WINFREY, “Oprah’s Next Chapter”: We agreed that there would be no conditions.

RAY SUAREZ: Lance Armstrong’s interview with Oprah Winfrey won’t begin airing until tomorrow night, but reports that he’s admitted to doping have already triggered strong reactions.

FRANKIE ANDREU, former teammate of Lance Armstrong: It’s a long time coming.

RAY SUAREZ: Frankie Andreu was once close to Armstrong, as a team captain of the U.S. Postal Service cycling team from 1998 to 2000.

FRANKIE ANDREU: I got e-mails.

RAY SUAREZ: But Andreu was ostracized after he and his fiancee, now wife, Betsy, testified in 2005 that Armstrong acknowledged using performance-enhancing drugs.

FRANKIE ANDREU: For my wife and I, we have been attacked and ripped apart by Lance and all of his people and all his supporters repeatedly for a long time.

And I just wish they wouldn’t have been so blind and opened up their eyes earlier to all the signs that indicated that there was deception there, so that we wouldn’t have had to suffer as much.

And it’s not only us. I mean, he’s ruined a lot of people’s lives.

RAY SUAREZ: Regulators from the official bodies that police cycling are also speaking out. Head of the World Anti-Doping Agency, David Howman, has demanded Armstrong make his confession under oath.

He told the Associated Press, “He’s got to follow a certain course. That is not talking to a talk show host.”

Armstrong vehemently denied doping for more than a decade, insisting he’d been tested hundreds of times and never failed a test. Now the International Cycling Union has commissioned an investigation into claims that positive test samples were hidden in exchange for money.

For its part, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has already banned Armstrong for life, and it’s pressing him now to name others involved in the long-running doping scheme on the Postal Service team.

Meanwhile, Armstrong was out of sight today, said to be on his way to Hawaii.