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News Wrap: Leading figure of Haqqani militant group killed in Pakistan

November 11, 2013 at 12:00 AM EST
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GWEN IFILL: We will hear more about relief efforts in the Philippines disaster after the news summary.

Iran reached a deal today with the U.N.’s nuclear chief to allow expanded monitoring of its nuclear sites. The announcement came one day after the U.S. and other world powers failed to achieve a broader agreement to curb Iran’s nuclear program. We will talk to Margaret Warner about where the negotiation stands later in the program.

Gunmen in Pakistan have killed a senior leader of the Haqqani Network, a major ally of the Afghan Taliban. Nasiruddin Haqqani was gunned down outside a bakery in Islamabad on Sunday night. The assailants fired from a motorcycle. Haqqani was believed to be the militant group’s chief financier.

America paid tribute to those who served in the military on this Veterans Day. In keeping with tradition, President Obama laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. He said, as U.S. combat troops wind down their mission in Afghanistan, the country must not forget their sacrifices.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Our troops wear the uniform for a time, yet they wear another proud title, the title of veteran, for decades, for the rest of their lives.

As a nation, we make sure we have the best-led, best-trained, best-equipped military in the world. We have to devote just as much energy and passion to making sure we have the best cared-for, best-treated, best-respected veterans in the world.

GWEN IFILL: One of the nation’s oldest veterans attended the Arlington ceremonies. Richard Overton is 107 years old, and lives in Texas. He was in the army in World War II, and served at Pearl Harbor, Okinawa and Iwo Jima.

Two weeks of climate change negotiations have opened in Warsaw, Poland. Envoys from 190 countries will discuss how to cut emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases linked to rising global temperatures. United Nations officials hope to lay the groundwork for a climate pact in 2015.

A wind farm 12 miles off the coast of Fukushima, Japan, powered up today for the first time. Officials hit the on switch from shore and then watched for the first turbine to start turning. Electricity is being fed to the grid that was crippled after an earthquake and tsunami severely damaged the Fukushima nuclear plant.

KAZUYOSHI AKABA, Japanese State Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry (through interpreter): Many people were victimized and hurt by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, so it is very meaningful to have a new source of energy, renewable energy based here at Fukushima. It is the government’s mission to ensure the project is a success.

GWEN IFILL: There will eventually be 143 floating turbines at the Fukushima wind farm anchored to the seabed by huge chains.

Wall Street had a quiet start to the week. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 21 points to close at 15,783. The Nasdaq rose a fraction of a point to stay above 3,919.