Full Program: Monday, January 6, 2014

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Tonight on the program, we take a look at a polar vortex descending on the U.S. and talk to two Midwest mayors about confronting the freezing weather. Also: What role the U.S. should play about al-Qaida in Iraq, the debate over emergency benefit extensions for long-term unemployed, Alzheimer's researchers seek better prevention and new tech at the Consumer Electronics Show.

Segments from Monday, January 6, 2014

  • What's new at the Consumer Electronics Show
    The Internet is moving beyond computers and phones. From your toaster to your car to your socks, almost everything you touch can be wired for connectivity. Judy Woodruff talks to Cecilia Kang of The Washington Post about the technological breakthroughs featured at the annual Consumer Electronics Show.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Alzheimer's researchers seek better prevention
    With no cure or successful treatment yet available, scientists are hoping to stave off Alzheimer's devastating debilitation by treating people before they show a single symptom. Jeffrey Brown reports on how researchers are looking at risk signs, lifestyle factors and alternative therapies to help keep brains healthy.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Poet-Doctor Rafael Campo reads 'Primary Care'
    Doctor, professor and highly-regarded poet Rafael Campo reads "Primary Care," a poem from his recently published sixth collection, "Alternative Medicine," which explores the primal relationship between language, empathy and healing.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Poet-Doctor Rafael Campo reads 'Hospital Song'
    Doctor, professor and highly-regarded poet Rafael Campo reads "Hospital Song," a poem from his recently published sixth collection, "Alternative Medicine," which explores the primal relationship between language, empathy and healing.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Poet-Doctor Rafael Campo reads 'Health'
    Doctor, professor and highly-regarded poet Rafael Campo reads "Health," a poem from his recently published sixth collection, "Alternative Medicine," which explores the primal relationship between language, empathy and healing.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Congress dives into fight over jobless benefits
    Emergency benefits for the long-term unemployed stopped for 1.3 million Americans at the end of December. Kwame Holman recaps the political debate over restarting those payments. Gwen Ifill gets perspectives from Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez and Douglas Holtz-Eakin of the American Action Forum on how to address unemployment.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Three medical students nurture the soul through poetry
    Three Harvard medical students, who chose to take time out from their hectic schedules to focus on reading poetry and honing their own writing skills, credit poetry with "feeding the soul," "doing justice" to hard realities that prose couldn't adequately address and giving them perspective on the parallels between medicine and writing.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Doctor/Poet Rafael Campo finds rhythm through a stethoscope
    Rafael Campo is a doctor, professor and highly-regarded poet who has just published his sixth volume titled, "Alternative Medicine," which explores the primal relationship between language, empathy and healing. For Campo, poetry and healing are intricately related. "To me the patients voice, the stories they have to tell are absolutely central to the work of healing."
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • What is U.S.'s role in driving out al-Qaida in Iraq?
    While Iraqi government tanks lined the outskirts of Fallujah, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki urged Sunni tribal leaders to help drive out al-Qaida militants. Judy Woodruff talks to journalist Jane Arraf and former U.S. ambassador to Iraq James F. Jeffrey about the sectarian grievances at play and the U.S.’s role.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014
  • Midwest mayors confront chilling weather
    Gwen Ifill talks to Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges and St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay about the precautions they are taking in their cities and what special help they offer for citizens like the elderly and the impoverished who may be in greater danger during this winter chill.
    Original Air Date: January 6, 2014