Full Program: PBS NewsHour full episode Aug. 2, 2017

Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump announces new efforts to overhaul legal immigration and vastly reduce the number of people allowed into the U.S. Also: A breakthrough in gene editing, the tug of war between Congress and the White House, attempts to stop superbugs, an Interior Department official speaks out and right-wing activists confronting refugees in the Mediterranean Sea.

Segments from Wednesday, August 2, 2017

  • Clashes over migrants turn Mediterranean into a battleground
    So far this year, almost 2,400 migrants have drowned in the Mediterranean. Italy is working to crack down on smugglers who send migrants on a deadly journey to Europe, and put stricter rules around rescue ships. But a group of right-wing, anti-immigrant activists is trying to take the crisis into their own hands by forcing migrants to turn back. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 508
  • How a Trump-endorsed bill would change U.S. immigration
    A bill proposed by Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., and Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., and endorsed by President Trump would cut in half the number of people legally allowed into the United States, and mark a profound shift in American policy in place for a half century. Alan Gomez of USA Today joins Judy Woodruff to discuss what the change could mean for future job growth.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 200
  • News Wrap: Trump signs Russia sanctions bill
    In the our news wrap Wednesday, President Trump signed a bill imposing new sanctions on Russia, but made clear his distaste for the legislation. Also, the White House is knocking down reports that the Justice Department is considering lawsuits against colleges over affirmative action.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 298
  • This gene-editing milestone raises big ethical questions
    For the first time in the U.S., a human embryo has been successfully edited to correct an inherited condition. By snipping out the gene that causes a specific heart disease, scientists also ensured the disease could not be passed down. But the milestone raises significant scientific and ethical questions. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Jessica Berg of Western Case Reserve University Law School.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 362
    This image shows early embryos two days after co-injection with a gene editing technology called CRISPR. A new study shows by editing at the time of fertilization, each new cell in the developing embryos was uniformly free of a heart disease-causing mutation. Photo by Oregon Health & Science University
  • We are running out of effective antibiotics fast
    Each year, superbugs -- viral bacterial infections resistant to common antibiotics -- infect more than two million Americans, killing at least 38,000. As the list of antibiotic resistant bacteria grows, so have the extraordinary efforts to prevent the spread of infection from patient to patient. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien and economics correspondent Paul Solman team up for a report.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 544
  • PBS NewsHour full episode Aug. 2, 2017
    Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump announces new efforts to overhaul legal immigration and vastly reduce the number of people allowed into the U.S. Also: A breakthrough in gene editing, the tug of war between Congress and the White House, attempts to stop superbugs, an Interior Department official speaks out and right-wing activists confronting refugees in the Mediterranean Sea.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 3251
    FULL PROGRAM
    August 2, 2017
  • Interior official turns Trump administration whistleblower
    A government scientist who studied dangerous climate change in the Arctic got an ironic reassignment at the Interior Department from the Trump administration: collecting checks from oil and gas companies. Joel Clement, the former director of the Interior Department Office of Policy Analysis, believes he was reassigned because he worked on climate change. Clement joins William Brangham to explain.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 371
  • Can John Kelly meet high expectations at the White House?
    He’s only been on the job for three days, but the installation of new Chief of Staff John Kelly is being closely watched for signs of change at the White House. Karine Jean-Pierre of Moveon.org and Barry Bennett, former senior advisor of the Trump campaign, join Judy Woodruff to discuss Kelly’s challenges, divisions between the president and Congress and the president’s words to police.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 442
    President Donald Trump shakes hands with John Kelly after he was sworn in as White House Chief of Staff in the Oval Office in Washington, D.C. Photo by Joshua Roberts/Reuters
  • Trump and Congress play tug of war on health care, Russia
    With significant divides on issues like health care and Russia, there appears to be growing tension between the White House and Capitol Hill. Lisa Desjardins and Nick Schifrin join Judy Woodruff for a closer look at both.
    Original Air Date: August 2, 2017
    Length: 358
  • Arctic journey shows the glaring effects of climate change
    A Finnish icebreaker has completed the Northwest Sea passage, which links the Atlantic and Pacific oceans across the Arctic. The trip, from Vancouver to Greenland’s capital city Nuuk, took 24 days -- a new record, in part because climate change has melted sea ice, making the journey easier. Frank Jordans, an Associated Press reporter who took the trip, joins Hari Sreenivasan from Greenland.
    Original Air Date: July 30, 2017
    Length: 222
    A general view of the port of Nuuk
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