Full Program: PBS NewsHour | Full Episode | Friday, August 22, 2014

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Tonight on the program, we look into Iraq and why Kurdish fighters lack the military might to fight against the Islamic State. Also: "Orange is the New Black" author Piper Kerman talks the American justice system and the Netflix adaptation, turning parents into teachers to battle "summer slide," the analysis of Ruth Marcus and Michael Gerson and a look behind the ALS ice bucket challenge.

Segments from Friday, August 22, 2014

  • PBS NewsHour | Full Episode | Friday, August 22, 2014
    Tonight on the program, we look into Iraq and why Kurdish fighters lack the military might to fight against the Islamic State. Also: "Orange is the New Black" author Piper Kerman talks the American justice system and the Netflix adaptation, turning parents into teachers to battle "summer slide," the analysis of Ruth Marcus and Michael Gerson and a look behind the ALS ice bucket challenge.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • How will ALS ice bucket challenge money be spent?
    From George W. Bush to Kermit the Frog, scores of celebrities and thousands of others have posted videos of ice water being dumped over their heads. It’s all to raise money to battle ALS, a disease that destroys nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, for which there is no cure. Judy Woodruff talks to Barbara Newhouse, president and CEO of the ALS Association, the charity at the center.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Marcus and Gerson on the Islamic State threat
    Washington Post columnists Ruth Marcus and Michael Gerson join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s top news, including the legacy of mistrust that laid the groundwork for unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, as well as the shifting U.S. stance on pursuing the Islamic State group after the murder of American journalist James Foley.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Turning parents into teachers to fight the ‘summer slide’
    As the new school year approaches, teachers know that their students may have regressed over the summer. But one program has made strides in preventing summer learning loss by enlisting parents as partners to help teach children. Special correspondent for education John Merrow reports on Springboard Collaborative, a non-profit organization that makes parents and teachers into partners.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • What Kurdish forces lack in fight against Islamic State
    Why has the famed Peshmerga army in Iraq, considered one of the best in the region, fallen back at several points along its internal frontier against the Islamic State? To investigate, chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner spent the day with Kurdish military leaders as they traveled to the town of Jalawla. She joins Judy Woodruff for an update.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Entertainment and activism of ‘Orange Is the New Black’
    Piper Kerman, whose memoir, "Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison,” inspired a hit series on Netflix, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the prevalence of mental illness, sexual abuse and inequality in the American justice system, as well as how the Emmy-nominated show compares to real life.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • News Wrap: Russian convoy rolls into Ukraine
    In our news wrap Friday, a stream of Russian trucks crossed the Ukrainian border without Kiev’s approval under the claim of sending humanitarian aid to separatists and after more than a week of waiting. Ukraine’s government has charged that Russia is lying about the purpose. Meanwhile, the U.N. human rights office now estimates more than 191,000 people have died in Syria’s civil war.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Piper Kerman answers your questions
    Piper Kerman, author of "Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison," sat down with Hari Sreenivasan to answer your questions about the awarding-winning Netflix series adaptation by the same name.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Explore higher education's future with Hari Sreenivasan
    Declining graduation rates, skyrocketing student debt and a paltry job market for graduates has many in the education community looking for new ideas to restart America’s colleges and universities. Join PBS NewsHour Weekend anchor Hari Sreenivasan as he explores innovative approaches that are changing the way higher education works around the nation.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Colleges emphasize student 'stickiness' to boost graduations
    In Tennessee, a disturbingly high dropout rate at public universities prompted the state to change how they fund schools: the more students graduate, the more a school gets paid. Hari Sreenivasan reports on the rise of performance-based funding and innovations by schools to keep students invested.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Grad rates double after reinvention of Chicago City Colleges
    Just 20 percent of community college students complete a degree in the U.S. Cheryl Hyman, chief of City Colleges of Chicago, is reshaping her school system to not only provide wide access to higher education, but to put students on the fastest track to relevant credentials. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Hyman, whose reforms have come with critique for making major cuts.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Group wants to turn student borrowers into activists
    Through the recession, college tuition skyrocketed at public universities to make up for flagging state funding. Some students who borrowed to keep up with rising costs face crushing debt repayments. Hari Sreenivasan travelled to Wisconsin to report on one group hoping to turn the state’s student borrowers into a powerful voting bloc.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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  • Online university skips class to be more accessible
    College for America, an online degree program, has no classes, professors or credit hours. It's been cited as an innovative way to make college more affordable. But how do its students qualify for a degree? Hari Sreenivasan reports from New Hampshire on a university that gives credit based on competency at the student's own pace.
    Original Air Date: August 22, 2014
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