Full Program: PBS NewsHour full episode March 13, 2017

Monday on the NewsHour, the Congressional Budget Office releases projected costs of the GOP's health care bill and the White House and REpublicans question the nonpartisan agency's analysis. Also: The low profile of Secretary of State Tillerson, famine and civil unrest in South Sudan, Al Gore's take on the Trump presidency, our Politics Monday analysis and a marathon over a frozen lake.

Segments from Monday, March 13, 2017

  • In South Sudan, ‘anything we can find we will try to eat’
    South Sudan, the world's youngest nation, is moving from the brink of genocide into the arms of a man-made famine. The UN reported last week that 7.5 million people are in need of assistance. John Ray of Independent Television News reports on the dire hunger crisis.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
  • Why is Rex Tillerson keeping a low profile?
    Rex Tillerson is the lowest-profile secretary of state in modern times. As he prepares for high-stakes visits to Asian nations, there's news that he won't be taking press corps, one of a number of unusual changes in how the State Department does business. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner joins Judy Woodruff to discuss his influence and whether he’s being sidelined.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
  • Two views on the pros and cons of the GOP health care bill
    The Congressional Budget Office predicts that more people than who got health care under Obamacare will lose coverage under the repeal bill proposed by Republicans. But the bill also shows cuts in federal spending and a smaller deficit. John Yang gets reaction to the proposed law from Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel of the University of Pennsylvania and Lanhee Chen of the Hoover Institution.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
  • News Wrap: Northeast hunkers down for late winter storm
    In our news wrap Monday, a blizzard watch is in effect for part of the Northeast, as New York City and other municipalities braced for a late storm that could bring up to 20 inches of snow. Also, Washington state went to federal court to stop President Trump's revised travel ban.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
  • Gore: We need to restore our immunity to blatant falsehoods
    Former Vice President Al Gore is troubled by what he sees as an American vulnerability to false assertions driving political policy. Gore has just re-released his book “The Assault on Reason,” 10 years after its original publication with an update for the Trump era. Gore joins Judy Woodruff in a discussion about the state of democratic dialogue, as well as his interactions with President Trump.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
  • Will the CBO estimate make GOP’s health bill harder to sell?
    The Congressional Budget Office numbers are out on the Republican health bill. What’s the political impact? Judy Woodruff talks with Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report and Tamara Keith of NPR about the difficulties of selling the American Health Care Act, plus the lack of evidence to back up President Trump’s tweet allegation of being wiretapped by President Obama.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 13, 2017
    Monday on the NewsHour, the Congressional Budget Office releases projected costs of the GOP's health care bill and the White House and REpublicans question the nonpartisan agency's analysis. Also: The low profile of Secretary of State Tillerson, famine and civil unrest in South Sudan, Al Gore's take on the Trump presidency, our Politics Monday analysis and a marathon over a frozen lake.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 13, 2017
  • At this Russian lake, winter is the best time for a marathon
    In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, Siberia's Lake Baikal is the perfect spot for a midwinter marathon. Runners take a 26.2 mile dash from one side of a lake to another in sub-freezing temperatures over nothing but ice.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
  • What the CBO sees ahead for the GOP health care bill
    An analysis of the Republican health care bill was released Monday by the Congressional Budget Office, offering best estimates on cost, coverage and other issues. Among the takeaways are that 24 million fewer people would be insured after a decade, and it would reduce the deficit by more than $300 billion. Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to take a look at the numbers.
    Original Air Date: March 13, 2017
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