Full Program: PBS NewsHour full episode March 7, 2017

Tuesday on the NewsHour, Republicans roll out a new health care plan to upend the Affordable Care Act. Also: A GOP senator weighs in on the ongoing Russia investigation, WikiLeaks documents show CIA hacking efforts, the military's model pre-K program, a fictional TV series about Russian spies intersects with reality and a French artist lives in a giant rock for a week.

Segments from Tuesday, March 7, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 7, 2017
    Tuesday on the NewsHour, Republicans roll out a new health care plan to upend the Affordable Care Act. Also: A GOP senator weighs in on the ongoing Russia investigation, WikiLeaks documents show CIA hacking efforts, the military's model pre-K program, a fictional TV series about Russian spies intersects with reality and a French artist lives in a giant rock for a week.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 7, 2017
  • Lankford: Trump tax records not relevant to Russia probe
    The first public hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election was announced by the House Intelligence Committee, while Senate Democrats have called for a special counsel. Republican Sen. James Lankford, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, says a lot of the work will remain behind closed doors. He speaks with Judy Woodruff about the Senate’s probes and more.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • Quality child care gives military families peace of mind
    Child care for U.S. military families is among the best in the country and is significantly less expensive than the average civilian care. Special correspondent Kavitha Cardoza of Education Week traveled to Camp Lejeune in North Carolina to see how the military invested in quality care that builds brains and emotional security.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • News Wrap: DOJ nominee questioned over Russia investigation
    In our news wrap Tuesday, Rod Rosenstein, nominee for the number two position at the Justice Department, faced questioning at his confirmation hearing over investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Rosenstein would oversee the probe if he's confirmed. Also, claims of bombs and even a sniper were called in to Jewish community centers and the Anti-Defamation League in several cities.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • How would the American Health Care Act affect cost, access?
    The House bill that Republicans plan to pass to replace the Affordable Care Act keeps some of the most popular provisions of the law, but it does not mandate coverage and shifts how the government would provide financial help. John Yang looks at key aspects of the plan with Sabrina Corlette of the Health Policy Institute and Lanhee Chen of the Hoover Institution.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • 'The Americans' sees a perfect moment to humanize espionage
    As investigations examine Russia’s role in last year’s election, the highly acclaimed television series “The Americans” has been delivering an intimate, fictional look at the old Cold War and the lives of two Russian spies working undercover in the U.S. William Brangham reports.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • Resistance to GOP health care bill comes from both sides
    On day one of the push to sell a long-awaited replacement for the Affordable Care Act, Republican leaders mounted an all-out offensive with help from both the president and vice president. Dubbed the American Health Care Act, the plan changes aspects of its predecessor, including contentious matters of Medicaid and tax credits. Lisa Desjardins reports from Capitol Hill.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • What it’s like to curl up inside a rock for a week
    In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, performance artist Abraham Poincheval knows what it's like to be stuck between a rock and a hard place: For an entire week, he lived inside a boulder at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
  • WikiLeaks publishes purported CIA cyber tools
    WikiLeaks published thousands of pages on Tuesday of what it says are files about the CIA and its hacking activities. The material comes reportedly from the CIA’s Center for Cyber Intelligence and includes a range of documents which describe cyber tools for hacking cellphones, computers, television and even vehicles. Jeffrey Brown speaks Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times about the revelations.
    Original Air Date: March 7, 2017
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