Full Program: PBS NewsHour full episode March 9, 2017

Thursday on the NewsHour, Republicans win an early victory for their health care bill. We take a look at how it could seriously impact Medicaid. Also: U.S. Marines land in Syria to help take back Raqqa, how our devices may be monitoring us, a hippie doctor's journey from Woodstock to eradicating smallpox in India, and more.

Segments from Thursday, March 9, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 9, 2017
    Thursday on the NewsHour, Republicans win an early victory for their health care bill. We take a look at how it could seriously impact Medicaid. Also: U.S. Marines land in Syria to help take back Raqqa, how our devices may be monitoring us, a hippie doctor's journey from Woodstock to eradicating smallpox in India, and more.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 9, 2017
  • House GOP drives health care bill through committees
    While two House committees worked through the night to pass the GOP health care bill in party line votes, party leaders aimed for the big picture. Top Democrat Nancy Pelosi decried the lack of analysis yet by the CBO, and Speaker Paul Ryan urged unsure Republicans by saying it is "the closest we will ever get to repealing and replacing Obamacare." Lisa Desjardins reports.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
  • A writer finds the words to express love for her dying dad
    Kelly Corrigan’s dad always used to tell her she was going to write the “great American novel.” At age 36, she was diagnosed with cancer, and soon after, her father got the same bad news. The prognosis unleashed a panic in her, which she unleashed through her writing. Corrigan, a New York Times bestselling author, gives her Brief But Spectacular take on the power of words.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
  • News Wrap: Illegal border crossing arrests fell in February
    In our news wrap Thursday, the Homeland Security Department reported that about 23,000 people were arrested trying to cross the southern U.S. border in February, down from 42,000 in January. Also, President Trump's revised travel ban faced its first challenge in federal court, filed by the state of Hawaii.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
  • U.S. forces in Syria to fight ISIS face chaotic map
    The battle for Raqqa, the capital of the Islamic State militant group in Syria, is coming. The U.S. military is sending 400 additional troops to join 500 Special Operations troops already on the ground, along with an array of Turkish, Russian, Syrian and rebel forces. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Michael Gordon of The New York Times about the challenges ahead.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
  • How the Republican bill would change funding for Medicaid
    Under the new Republican health care plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, there are major changes to Medicaid funding for states. Judy Woodruff talks to Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News about why those changes are causing concerns for some states.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
  • Insurance CEO: Medicaid cuts are ‘going to affect everyone’
    Dr. Mario Molina of Molina Healthcare, an insurance executive whose business is focused on Medicaid patients, is concerned about the way the Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act will not only affect patients on Medicaid, but cause major economic ripples for states and the health care system. Molina joins William Brangham to discuss what he sees as at stake.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
  • Stamping out smallpox is a chapter of his Brilliant life
    Larry Brilliant jokes that he doesn't live up to his last name, but he has lived a remarkable life, from his early days in the San Francisco hippie scene, to his work as one of the world’s leading disease fighters who helped eradicate smallpox. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro sits down with Brilliant to look back at his career and current work identifying today’s global threats.
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
  • Are smart devices giving up access to your digital life?
    WikiLeaks' release of a trove of documents about the CIA's ability to breach smartphone and TV encryption was a revelation of potential vulnerabilities that surprised many. Hari Sreenivasan separates fact from fiction about their capabilities to take advantage of those devices with Brian Barrett, news editor of Wired, and how to be mindful about the reality of today’s “internet of things.”
    Original Air Date: March 9, 2017
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