Full Program: PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode June 10, 2017

On this edition for Sunday, June 10, we look at what happened in Washington this week while the nation focused on former FBI director James Comey, and an exhibit follows the capture of Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann. Later, how social media can help mobilize protest. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

Segments from Saturday, June 10, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode June 10, 2017
    On this edition for Sunday, June 10, we look at what happened in Washington this week while the nation focused on former FBI director James Comey, and an exhibit follows the capture of Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann. Later, how social media can help mobilize protest. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2017
    Length: 1345
    General view of the U.S. Capitol dome in the pre-dawn darkness in Washington
  • What else happened in Washington as the world watched Comey
    The first public testimony of former FBI director James Comey since his firing by President Donald Trump captured the nation’s attention this week. Meanwhile, the Senate made moves on a Republican healthcare bill and the House voted to roll back Dodd-Frank financial reforms. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins Hari Sreenivasan from Santa Barbara, California, with more.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2017
    Length: 210
    washington monument
  • New exhibit follows the hunt for a Nazi leader
    In 1962, Adolf Eichmann, one of the key architects of the Holocaust, was executed in Israel, the culmination of a years-long search for him by the Israeli government. The backstory that led to that moment is now on vivid display in “Operation Finale,” an exhibit at the Illinois Holocaust Museum. Eddie Aruzza, a correspondent for PBS station WTTW in Chicago, has this story.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2017
    Length: 268
    FILER OF ADOLF EICHMANN TRIAL IN JERUSALEM IN 1961.
  • How online social movements translate to offline results
    In recent years, social media has played a key role in organizing and getting protesters into the streets in the U.S. and around the world. Though these tools can help rally people to action, a new book, "Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest," argues they also have limits. Zeynep Tufekci, the book’s author, joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on technology and protest.
    Original Air Date: June 10, 2017
    Length: 505
    A general view shows Tahrir Square as Egyptian riot policemen try to disperse protesters in Cairo
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