Full Program: PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode June 11, 2017

On this edition for Sunday, June 11, President Donald Trump turns his focus to an infrastructure plan, and a new film follows the only bank charged after the 2008 financial crisis. Later, hear from a survivor of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida, on her life a year after the massacre. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

Segments from Sunday, June 11, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode June 11, 2017
    On this edition for Sunday, June 11, President Donald Trump turns his focus to an infrastructure plan, and a new film follows the only bank charged after the 2008 financial crisis. Later, hear from a survivor of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida, on her life a year after the massacre. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2017
    Length: 1347
    highways infrastructure
  • Trump’s infrastructure plan short on specifics
    President Donald Trump is promising to spend a trillion dollars to rebuild the nation’s infrastructure. But beyond general statements about private-public partnerships and dismantling regulations that can delay construction, the White House has yet to put out a detailed plan. Washington Post reporter Mike Debonis joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on the situation.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2017
    Length: 209
    Cars travel on city streets and highway overpasses in San Diego
  • A year after Pulse shooting, survivor reflects on recovery
    In the early morning of June 12, 2016, Omar Mateen opened fire at Pulse, a popular gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. It was the worst mass shooting of civilians in American history, leaving 49 people dead and dozens injured. NewsHour Weekend’s Ivette Feliciano spoke with one of the survivors of the attack about her harrowing experience inside the club and how she’s recovering one year later.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2017
    Length: 270
    The parking lot at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando
  • New film follows only bank charged after financial crisis
    A new documentary, "Abacus: Small Enough to Jail," tells the story of Abacus Federal Savings Bank, a small, family-run bank in New York City. Abacus was the only bank ­­in the U.S. to face criminal charges after the 2008 financial crisis. The film is scheduled to air later this year on the PBS program FRONTLINE. NewsHour Weekend's Saskia de Melker talked to the film's director, Steve James.
    Original Air Date: June 11, 2017
    Length: 426
    Woman enters branch of Abacus Federal Savings Bank on Bowery Street in New York
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