Full Program: PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode Sept. 16, 2017

On this edition for Saturday, Sept. 16, British police make an arrest following Friday’s London train bombing, and the U.S. takes the war on the Islamic State to federal court. Later, American troops are still deployed in Japan more than 70 years after the end of World War II and many on the island of Okinawa want them to leave. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

Segments from Saturday, September 16, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 16, 2017
    On this edition for Saturday, Sept. 16, British police make an arrest following Friday’s London train bombing, and the U.S. takes the war on the Islamic State to federal court. Later, American troops are still deployed in Japan more than 70 years after the end of World War II and many on the island of Okinawa want them to leave. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2017
    Length: 1496
    london bomb
  • What we know about ISIS-related crimes in the U.S.
    Over the past few years, Islamic State operatives or sympathizers have carried out attacks on civilians around the world, and U.S. federal prosecutors have brought ISIS-related terrorism charges in 135 cases. This week, the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School released a report on those cases. Karen Greenberg, the center's director, joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on their findings.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2017
    Length: 270
    federal court
  • More than 400,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh
    About 400,000 Rohingya, members of a Muslim minority group, have fled majority-Buddhist Myanmar into Bangladesh during the last month. The wave began when Myanmar's military cracked down on an armed resistance by the Rohingya minority, who have long been persecuted there. Antoni Slodkowski, Reuters' Myanmar bureau chief, joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2017
    Length: 169
    Rohingya refugees
  • On Okinawa, locals want U.S. troops to leave
    Okinawa has hosted the most American troops in Japan since after World War II, when the U.S. agreed to protect a demilitarized Japan. Though the island is strategically located to respond to threats from North Korea or China, most Okinawa residents consider the U.S. military presence disruptive and hindering economic development. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Amy Guttman reports.
    Original Air Date: September 16, 2017
    Length: 590
    Okinawa, u.s. military
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