Full Program: Tuesday, July 1, 2014

On tonight’s program, Iraq lawmakers walk out of parliament in a standoff over their leadership and demonstrators flood Hong Kong demanding democracy. Fred de Sam Lazaro travels to Vietnam to investigate human trafficking, Jeffrey Brown uncovers Facebook’s massive user experiment and our roundtable of Marcia Coyle, Erin Murphy and Neal Katyal consider the year at the Supreme Court.

Segments from Tuesday, July 1, 2014

  • PBS NewsHour - Tuesday July 1, 2014
    On tonight’s program, Iraq lawmakers walk out of parliament in a standoff over their leadership and demonstrators flood Hong Kong demanding democracy. Fred de Sam Lazaro travels to Vietnam to investigate human trafficking, Jeffrey Brown uncovers Facebook’s massive user experiment and our roundtable of Marcia Coyle, Erin Murphy and Neal Katyal consider the year at the Supreme Court.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
    An Iraqi woman holds her child outside of a displacement camp for those escaping the fighting in and around the city of Mosul on June 28 in Khazair, Iraq. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images
    FULL PROGRAM
    July 1, 2014
  • As term ends, Supreme Court characterized by disagreement
    While the Supreme Court united on cases concerning presidential appointments and mobile phone searches, there was stark division on issues like campaign finance, contraception and religion. Jeffrey Brown looks back at the big decisions at the court this year with Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal, Constitutional lawyer Erin Murphy and former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
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  • Pro-democracy demonstrators rally in Hong Kong
    Tens of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators marched through the streets of Hong Kong Tuesday on the anniversary marking the region’s handover to the People’s Republic of China. The protesters are calling for greater autonomy and the right to select who governs them. John Sparks of Independent Television News reports from Hong Kong.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
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  • How ISIL's bid for a new caliphate taps historical yearning
    How does ISIL's declaration of a new Islamic state complicate the military and political problems already challenging the Iraqi government? Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner joins Judy Woodruff to examine the history of the term “caliphate” and what threats ISIL poses across the region.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
    Refugees Fleeing ISIS Offensive Pour Into Kurdistan
  • News Wrap: Fighting resumes in Eastern Ukraine
    In our news wrap Tuesday, fighting resumed in Eastern Ukraine a day after President Petro Poroshenko ended a ceasefire with pro-Russian rebels. Also, a car bomb killed at least 56 people in Nigeria in the northeastern state where more than 200 girls were abducted in April.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
    Ukrainian troops stand guard at the headquarters of the Ukrainian army's Anti-Terrorist Operation, ATO, near the eastern Ukrainian city of Izyum, near Donetsk, on June 20, 2014. Photo by Sergey Bobok/AFP/Getty Images
  • Can China assuage Hong Kong's discontent over autonomy?
    Nearly two decades after China took control of Hong Kong from the United Kingdom, the rules governing the city-state’s autonomy remain undefined. The New Yorker ‘s Evan Osnos, author of "Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China," joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss the frustrations fueling the protests.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
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  • Facebook’s psychological study ends up testing users’ trust
    Many Facebook users were upset by news that the social media network manipulated incoming content for hundreds of thousands of people without telling them. The manipulation was conduction for a study -- published in a respected scientific journal -- measuring how attitudes were affected by either positive or negative posts. Judy Woodruff learns more from Reed Albergotti of The Wall Street Journal.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
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  • Iraqi parliament seeks unity while insurgency advances
    Minority Sunni and Kurdish lawmakers walked out of a meeting of the new Iraqi parliament after majority Shiites failed to select a replacement for Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, escalating fears among citizens as Sunni insurgents advance on the Baghdad. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner reports.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
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  • Vietnam battles sex trafficking along China’s border
    China is like a giant magnet to neighboring Vietnam, luring workers with higher wages and transportation to other countries. But many women are taken to China involuntarily to be sold into marriage or to work in brothels. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the human trafficking across the long land border and the efforts to stop it.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
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  • Breaking stereotypes of Native American artists
    "Cross Currents," an exhibit traveling around Colorado, features works by nine Native American artists who challenge our notion of what that means. Rocky Mountain PBS went inside to see what they could learn.
    Original Air Date: July 1, 2014
    Photo by Janine Trudell/Rocky Mountain PBS