Topics » Nation   Dec. 30, 2013

New Year's Eve traditions take local twists with unique ball drops

The Watermelon(s) Drop

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The Watermelon(s) Drop

The 6th Annual Watermelon Drop in Vincennes, Ind., includes both a rise and a fall. An 18-foot sculpture of a watermelon is lifted up, but at midnight the bottom opens up to drop an unusual payload --- 14 real watermelons, grown by local farmers.

“Where else can you watch a 500-pound watermelon rise high in the sky as midnight approaches, culminating in 14 watermelons dropped on our platform at the stroke of midnight --- including fireworks? There really is no better way to ring in the New Year,” Rick Linenburg, chairman of the drop's planning committee, said.

In addition to New Year’s Eve, the watermelon makes appearances during Independence Day and Christmas parades.

Ever wonder why we drop the ball -- or other objects -- to welcome the New Year? Read about the history behind this wholly American tradition

Photo Essay

Photo Essay