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Snapchat says ‘sorry’ after 4.6 million users’ data was leaked

BY newsdesk  January 9, 2014 at 3:05 PM EST

Updated Jan. 9: One week after Snapchat’s database was hacked, the company released an apology to their users, and a security update. The update gives users the chance to opt-out of linking their phone number with their user name.

4.6 million of the photo messaging application’s users’ phone numbers and names were leaked to an online database last Wednesday.

The company allegedly behind the hack, SnapchatDB, told The Verge that they did so to raise public awareness about Snapchat’s security — or lack thereof — protections.

The breach came a week after Gibson Security explained how the app could be hacked to expose users’ personal information. Snapchat’s response said the company had recently created “additional counter-measures” for the app as a safeguard against vulnerability.

SnapchatDB wasn’t satisfied with Snapchat’s response. Their hacking was meant to prove a point about the company’s need for better safety measures.

Related:

When you’re the target of a credit card theft, arm yourself with these tips

H/T Colleen Shalby

4.6 million Snapchat users’ information leaked

BY newsdesk  January 1, 2014 at 2:12 PM EST

While Snapchat users were sleeping off their New Year’s Eve celebrations, their personal data may have been compromised. 4.6 million of the photo messaging application’s users’ phone numbers and names were leaked to an online database.

The company allegedly behind the hack, SnapchatDB, told The Verge that they did so to raise public awareness about Snapchat’s security — or lack thereof — protections.

The breach comes a week after Gibson Security explained how the app could be hacked to expose users’ personal information. Snapchat’s response said the company had recently created “additional counter-measures” for the app as a safeguard against vulnerability.

SnapchatDB wasn’t satisfied with Snapchat’s response. Their hacking was meant to prove a point about the company’s need for better safety measures. It’s unclear just how the leaded data could affect users at the moment. But if you’re wondering whether your information was compromised, Washington Post points to a website that lets you know.

Related:

When you’re the target of a credit card theft, arm yourself with these tips

H/T Colleen Shalby