60 Killed in Bomb Attacks Across Iraq

BY News Desk  August 15, 2011 at 8:18 AM EST


Coordinated explosions in more than a dozen cities in Iraq killed at least 60 people Monday morning. The devices were implanted in cars, on roadsides, light poles and in the vehicle of a suicide bomber.

The attacks come as Iraqi political leaders consider requesting U.S. troop presence beyond the planned Dec. 31 withdrawal deadline, as questions persist about the ability of the Iraqi government to maintain security and combat insurgents.

Iraqi security forces inspect damages after two car bombs, one of which was detonated by a suicide attacker, detonated in the holy Shiite city of Najaf. Photo by Qassem Zein/AFP/Getty Images.

Mubarak Trial Will No Longer Be Televised

The trial of former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak will no longer be televised live per a judge’s order. Mubarak, 83, has been appearing in court in a bed and is reportedly in ill health. He faces charges over the killing of some 900 protesters in Tahrir Square and is being tried along with his sons, Alaa and Gamal. He faces a possible death penalty if convicted.

Judge Ahmed Refaat recessed the trial until Sept. 5. Protesters from both sides converged outside the courtroom, and riot police were on hand to deal with periodic fights between rival demonstrators.

Google to Buy Motorola Mobility for $12.5 Billion

Google will acquire Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion in a deal approved by both companies’ boards. google_signThe acquisition is geared to pit Google against the Apple iPhone and BlackBerry and launches it into the hardware manufacturing side of the mobile market.

The deal boosted Motorola Mobility market shares by $40, a 63 percent increase over its value on Friday.

Photo by Robert Galbraith-Pool/Getty Images.

Pakistan May Have Offered China Pieces of Downed Helicopter

U.S. officials said that Pakistan may have shared with China pieces of the Black Hawk helicopter that crashed during the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

Navy SEALs who conducted the raid had destroyed most of the helicopter, which contained highly sensitive technology, but the tail section was still in one piece. U.S. officials believe Chinese military engineers were given access to it.

According to the New York Times,

“Such cooperation with China would be provocative, providing further evidence of the depths of Pakistan’s anger over the Bin Laden raid, which was carried out without Pakistan’s approval. The operation, conducted in early May, also set off an escalating tit-for-tat scuffle between American and Pakistani spies.”

China and Pakistan cooperate on military issues, with Chinese engineers based in the country. The tail section in question has since been returned to the United States.

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