Americans will spend big bucks to be part of the Super Bowl action

BY newsdesk  January 22, 2014 at 5:06 PM EST
Heading to the Super Bowl soon? Hope you have a friend in New York -- hotel rooms that normally cost $100 a night are now $1,000. Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

Heading to the Super Bowl soon? Hope you have a friend in New York — hotel rooms that normally cost $100 a night are now $1,000. Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

The NFL’s Super Bowl is one of the biggest sporting events on the planet, a fact made obvious by the stunning amount of money spent and food eaten over the course of the game’s weekend.

Super Bowl XLVIII, a contest between the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 2, at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey, promises to be no different.

DealNews.com’s Lou Carlozo broke down the numbers in a column Tuesday, counting everything from Vegas bets to hotel room costs:

“In 2013, sports fans bet a record $98.9 million at Nevada casinos on the Super Bowl, according to the Nevada Gaming Control Board. That number shattered 2012′s mark of $93.9 million, and based on conservative estimates, we may see $104 million in bets placed on this year’s contest.”

“Buffalo, N.Y.’s home team may be fated to never win a Super Bowl for the next 173 years, but as the birthplace of the Buffalo wing, it’s winning a Super Bowl contest of a different sort. Wings and Super Bowl Sunday go hand-in-hand, and we’re forecasting that 1.25 billion wings will be eaten this year, based on 2013 and 2012 figures from none other than the National Chicken Council.”

“Inexpensive rooms that normally cost around $100 per night are going for $1,000 during the week of the big event. And while that’s a 90 percent increase, that’s chump change compared to the more luxurious options. A night at the Ritz Carlton will cost $5,000 per night or more, while renting a luxury home will clock in at $35,000 per week.”

In addition to Carlozo’s data, a 2013 Nielsen article tells us more about consumers’ habits during the big game — including the surprising fact that vegetables and fresh fruit are served more often than pizza and buffalo wings.