Colombia’s Congress ratifies retooled peace deal

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Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos gives a speech after signing a new peace accord with Marxist FARC rebel leader Rodrigo Londono, known as Timochenko, in Bogota, Colombia on Nov. 24. Photo by Jaime Saldarriaga/Reuters

Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos gives a speech after signing a new peace accord with Marxist FARC rebel leader Rodrigo Londono, known as Timochenko, in Bogota, Colombia on Nov. 24. Photo by Jaime Saldarriaga/Reuters

The Colombian Congress ratified a revised peace agreement between the government and FARC rebels Wednesday night.

The public narrowly rejected the original peace agreement in an October referendum. Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos skipped the public vote this time and brought the revised version directly to Congress.

The 310-page agreement passed unanimously. Opponents of the deal, led by former President Alvaro Uribe, boycotted the vote, reported the Associated Press.

Changes from the original version include a prohibition on foreign magistrates judging alleged crimes by government or FARC troops, and a commitment from rebels to forfeit assets to help pay back victims, according to the AP.

The goal of the agreement is to end the 52-year civil war between the government and rebel groups, and to reintegrate former fighters into society.

PBS NewsHour correspondent John Yang speaks with special correspondent Nadja Drost about the changes in the latest deal and how the Colombian people are reacting to it.

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