Haiti Relief Effort: How to Contribute

 

For readers looking to contribute to the relief effort in Haiti, here are a few of the organizations collecting donations. NPR has also compiled a list, which you can find here:

Hope for Haiti Now

Action Against Hunger

AmeriCares

American Red Cross — Donate $10 to the Red Cross to be charged to your cell phone bill by texting “HAITI” to “90999”

Care

Catholic Relief Services

Clinton Bush Haiti Fund

Direct Relief International

Doctors Without Borders

Habitat for Humanity

International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

Mercy Corps

Operation USA

Oxfam America

Oxfam International

Partners in Health

Salvation Army

Save the Children

Shelter Box

United Nations Children’s Fund

USAID

William J. Clinton Foundation — Donate $10 to the Clinton Foundation’s Haiti Relief Fund to be charged to your cell phone bill by texting “HAITI” to “20222”

World Food Program

World Vision

Yele Haiti

Google has also compiled some resources on relief efforts here and launched a dynamic spreadsheet called the “Haiti Situation Tracking Form” that allows people to post messages looking for loved ones.

Americans looking for information on U.S. citizens living in Haiti have been advised by the State Department to call 1-888-407-4747 or provide information via e-mail. In Haiti, calls regarding the welfare of U.S. citizens can be made to the Embassy’s Consular Task Force in Port-au-Prince at 509-2229-8942, 509-2229-8089, 509-2229-8322 or 509-2229-8672.

Charity Navigator, a nonprofit group that rates charity organizations based on their financial stability, has posted this update on how some aid groups, which were already working in Haiti, are working to assist in earthquake victims.

The FBI is advising people interested in donating to the relief effort to do the usual homework and avoid scams related to the disaster.

And on Jan. 18, the NewsHour examined the phenomenon of the rise in mobile texting of donations, and talked to Chronicle of Philanthropy editor Stacy Palmer, about the benefits and pitfalls of the current relief effort.

Updated on Jan. 22, 2010, at 5:20 pm ET The PBS NewsHour does not certify the fund allocations of the charities listed here or intend this list as an endorsement of their work. This is intended as a tool to help those interested in contributing to relief efforts start their research.

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