Homeland lifts Ebola screenings for travelers from Mali

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A sign asks patients to inform staff if they have fever, cough, trouble breathing, rash, vomiting or diarrhea symptoms and have recently traveled internationally at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan, New York. Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters

A sign asks patients to inform staff if they have fever, cough, trouble breathing, rash, vomiting or diarrhea symptoms and have recently traveled internationally at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan, New York. Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters

WASHINGTON — The Department of Homeland Security is ending Ebola-related airport screening procedures for travelers from Mali.

Starting Tuesday, travelers from Mali won’t be subject to monitoring for possible symptoms of Ebola upon arrival. And, they will no longer be required to enter the U.S. through one of five designated airports.

Homeland Security and the Centers for Disease Control say the requirements are being lifted because two 21-day incubation cycles have passed since the last Ebola patient in that West African nation had contact with someone not wearing personal protective equipment. There are also no active Ebola cases in Mali right now.

Travel restrictions and monitoring remain in place for visitors from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

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