EU in Talks Over Ireland’s Finances; Germany Warns of Possible Terrorist Attack; House to Select Leadership

BY News Desk  November 17, 2010 at 8:17 AM EDT


(Photo by Aidan Crawley/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

European leaders continued talks on how to tackle Ireland’s troubled finances, paving the way for a possible bailout that could be worth as much as €100 billion. The crisis in Ireland’s banks has sent ripples of worry through other European Union countries, who are concerned for the euro’s survival. So far, Ireland has resisted a massive bailout.

Germany on Alert for Possible Terror Attacks

German officials said they have been given information on “sustained efforts” to carry out terrorist attacks at the end of November, leading to tighter security measures throughout the nation’s airports and train stations. The warnings reportedly came after two bombs were intercepted between Yemen and the United States last month.

Cholera Spreads to Dominican Republic, Riots Continue in Haiti

Aid agencies called for calm as rioters, burning tires and cars, disrupted efforts to treat those affected by the outbreak of cholera. The riots were spread by rumors that the disease had come from U.N. peacekeepers from Nepal. The waterborne illness has also spread to the neighboring Dominican Republic, leading the nation to issue its highest health alert.

House to Select Leadership

The new House of Representatives, with an incoming Republican majority, will elect its leaders Wednesday. Despite discontent over their midterm losses, Democrats are expected to make current House Speaker Nancy Pelosi the minority leader, while Republicans will likely make Ohio Rep. John Boehner the House’s next speaker.

For more on the day’s politics news, read the Morning Line.

TSA Chief to Testify Before Congress, Face Questions on Air Security

Transportation Security Administration chief John Pistole will answer questions today before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. Though the appearance had been scheduled previously, the recent controversies over full-body scans and pat-downs, which some say are too invasive, have increased scrutiny of the TSA’s procedures.