Indian Power Being Restored Slowly After Massive Grid Failures

BY Aisha Turner  July 31, 2012 at 2:52 PM EST

Indian Blackout

Indian porters push a parcels cart over railway tracks near a web of high voltage line feeders at a train station in New Delhi on July 31, 2012. A massive power failure hit India for the second day running as three regional power grids collapsed, blacking out more than half the country in a crisis affecting more than 600 million people. Photo by Roberto Schmidt/ AFP


Hundreds of millions of people across India were without power today as the world’s worst blackout stretched into Tuesday. India’s power grid collapsed in 14 states throughout the country’s northern and eastern regions. And for many of those left without power, this was the second time in two days.

The outages stalled more than 500 trains and delayed would-be passengers. In central New Delhi, traffic choked dark city streets.

To ease the frustration the country’s southern and western grids supplied power to help restore services caused by the outages. As of this morning, the government could not pinpoint a reason for today’s outage. Yesterday’s outage was blamed on an overdrawing of power, but today’s failure seemed to indicate a technical fault. Weak monsoons are also getting some of the blame — less rainfall means less water for hydroelectric dams.

By nightfall in India, most of the power in the north near New Delhi had been restored. But the infrastructure problems are still a major blow for Asia’s third largest economy trying to make its mark on the world stage.

For more coverage of the power failure in India, see the coverage on Sky News and the Hindustan Times , both reporting from New Delhi.

Indian Blackout

An Indian commuter sleeps near a sign warning commuters of high voltage electric lines beyond the fence at a train station in New Delhi on July 31, 2012. A massive power failure hit India for the second day running as three regional power grids collapsed, blacking out more than half the country in a crisis affecting over 600 million people. Photo By Roberto Schmidt/AFP

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