Algeria: Gadhafi Family Members Crossed Border

BY News Desk  August 29, 2011 at 2:00 PM EDT

2 p.m. ET | The Algerian government said that Moammar Gadhafi’s wife, three children and a handful of grandchildren have fled to Algeria, which borders Libya, but provided no information on the whereabouts of Gadhafi himself.

His son Hannibal, infamous for lavish parties with headline entertainers from the United States, and his wife Aline, who reportedly scalded her nanny, are among the family members believed to be in Algeria.

An NTC spokesman said that if they are in fact harbored in Algeria, “we will demand that Algerian authorities hand them over to Libya to be tried before Libyan courts.”

Find out more about the Gadhafi family with our “Guide to the Gadhafis” graphic.


Libyan rebels gather around a destroyed Afriqiyah Airways plane in Tripoli on Monday. Photo by Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images.

National Transitional Council leader Mustafa Abdul Jalil asked NATO for its continued support as rebels close in on Moammar Gadhafi’s hometown of Sirte and consolidate their hold on most of Libya, more than a week after rebels converged on Tripoli and took over one of Gadhafi’s main compounds.

“Gadhafi is still capable is doing something awful in the last moments,” Jalil warned.

The NATO mandate stands through the end of September and contniues to support the rebels’ advance with planes.

As the battles subside in Tripoli, hundreds of prisoners have been released. The BBC reported:

Some had been captured by Col Gaddafi’s forces during the last six months; others had been held for years.

They spoke of torture, beatings and starvation rations.

Rebel leaders have spoken of their concerns for tens of thousands of others – taken prisoner in the past few months – who are still missing.

The United Nations has said it will investigate reports of human rights abuses in the six-month-old war.

Since rebels converged on Tripoli, there has been an outcry over convicted Lockerbie bomber Abdel Baset al-Megrahi’s release in 2009 because of poor health. Al-Megrahi had been found guilty in 2001 of the 1998 bombing of a Pan Am flight over Scotland that killed 270 people. Britain’s decision to send him back to Libya — where he was greeted with fanfare by Gadhafi’s government — was decried by victims families. Al-Megrahi is now said to be in a coma and near death.

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