Michelle Obama Makes the 2010 Soft Sell to Democrats: Don’t Stay Home

BY Quinn Bowman  October 6, 2010 at 1:54 PM EST

First lady Michelle Obama told listeners Wednesday on a conference call aimed at getting out the Democratic vote in November to remind voters that “change is difficult and we are just beginning to see the results of our work.”

The first lady also is hitting the campaign trail for Democratic Senate candidates in Illinois, Washington, Wisconsin, Colorado and California ahead of the midterm elections.

Wednesday’s conference call came a day after Mrs. Obama asked Organizing for America supporters to donate at least $3 to the organization, which was formed to help President Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign.

She reminisced on the call about the heady days after then-Sen. Barack Obama’s victory in Iowa, his convention speech in Denver, and his historic inauguration in January 2009.

“I met some of you out there in Iowa when we proved that polls don’t matter and that the real community organizing can inspire young people and the old to get involved,” she said.

Absent from her message was any mention of the Republicans potentially poised to make significant gains in Congress in November and possibly thwart President Obama’s agenda.

Mrs. Obama also took two questions from the audience. Monica from St. Louis asked how people can be convinced that voting makes a difference during hard economic times.

“How do we get people fired and up and excited to come out and vote for Democrats considering so many of them are concerned about their personal economic situation and just aren’t very optimistic about how voting can change that?” she asked.

After reminding the audience that her husband inherited a recession, Mrs. Obama cited eight months of job growth in the American economy as evidence that the stimulus package and other efforts by Democrats are helping the middle class, but that the work is not done yet.

“I would urge all of you out there as you’re knocking on doors to remind people that change is difficult and we are just beginning to see the results of our work. So don’t stay home. Don’t let frustration keep you from voting, because as we said … the election isn’t about Barack or one single party, it’s about all of us making a difference. Voting not just in a presidential election is an important part of that,” she said.