Batkid returns and he’s stronger than ever

BY Justin Scuiletti  July 31, 2014 at 3:47 PM EST
When Miles Scott, a  5-year-old in remission after a three-year battle with leukemia, said he wanted to be Batman last year, he wasn't kidding. And the San Francisco Make-A-Wish Foundation took him at his word and made him a legit "Batkid" for a day. Now his story will be made into a documentary. Photo by Flickr user Shelly Prevost https://www.flickr.com/photos/photogism/

When Miles Scott, a 5-year-old in remission after a three-year battle with leukemia, said he wanted to be Batman last year, he wasn’t kidding. And the San Francisco Make-A-Wish Foundation took him at his word and made him a real “Batkid” for a day. Now his story will be made into a documentary. Photo by Flickr user Shelly Prevost

While Batman celebrates his diamond jubilee this year, it was last November that a tinier black-caped crusader stole headlines.

It was a wish come true for Batkid, aka Miles Scott, a little boy in remission after a three-year battle with leukemia. Thanks to San Francisco’s chapter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation and tens of thousands of volunteers, 5-year-old Miles donned the cape and cowl of Batman and jumped into action to crush the Riddler, rescue a damsel in distress and save the San Francisco Giants’ mascot Lou Seal.

The event was so spectacular, even President Barack Obama issued Miles a congratulatory message.

The entire day’s production, executed on the streets of San Francisco — Gotham City — was put on film and now, nearly a year later, Miles’ story is being made into a documentary. The trailer for “Batkid Begins” was released this week:

One person who was along for the ride every step of the way was Miles’ mom, Natalie Scott.

“Miles and his dad, Nick, started watching Adam West Batman series around the age of 3,” Scott told the PBS NewsHour in an email. “At this time while Miles was going through treatment I think he knew he had to be stronger than the average person.”

Scott said the Batkid saga gave her family the ability to put the painful time in their lives behind them. It has allowed Miles to move on with a new strength.

“The wish was closure for us,” said Scott. “Miles is definitely a much more confident boy after treatment and has come out his shell this last year in kindergarten. He is growing and progressing well for his age and has the most kind hearted soul.”

And even though playing Batkid was a thrill, Scott said he nevers dons his cape unless he’s “actually going to work with the Real Batman,” Eric Johnston the veteran video game programmer who played his “sidekick” on that November day.

“Miles does feel he is a real hero and to us he will always be with or without the Batkid title.”